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Anna Karenina Audio Download – Unabridged

4.2 out of 5 stars 367 customer reviews

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Audio Download, Unabridged, 20 Feb 2008
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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 38 hours and 5 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 20 Feb. 2008
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQ1WS8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Oct. 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It has to be mentioned that Anna Karenina is viewed by a lot of people as the perfect novel, and who am I to disagree? I have read it many times in numeorus traslations and so I feel that I should point out that this was translated by the late Constance Garnett. Because her translations are all out of copyright she is the world's most read English translator of Russian literature. It must be said that she did have a tendency to leave things out if she couldn't understand it and she did make alterations, mainly so that it would flow better in English. I know she has come in for a lot of criticism over the years but it should never be forgotten that she gave the reading public here and in the US translations of all the Russian greats and made them easily accessible for all.

Anna Karenina the novel, is absolutely brilliant, it holds you from the beginning, all the way throuh to the end. Taking us through such things as hypocrisy and jealousy, it takes us into a family and keeps us rooted in all the problems that it faces. If you have never read this before then now is definitely the time, if you have already read it, surely it is about time you read it again.

So remember, although this isn't the most accurate translation on the market, this is free and is easily readable, plus it does keep to the story, also the biggest complaints about her accuracy usually fall on her translations of Dostoevsky more than any other author.
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Format: Paperback
(n.b This review refers to the Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translation).
I'll keep this review quite short, as there are plenty of others detailing just why this is regarded as one of the all-time great novels.

As this was my first experience of reading Tolstoy, I had been slightly daunted by the literary (and literal!) weight of this novel. Happily, I found that "Anna Karenina" was instantly accessible, in terms of both narrative and style.

The story is a classic tale of a tragic love affair between the beautiful, highly-strung Anna - one of the most complex and authentic portrayals of female psychology in literature - and the passionate, ambitious Count Vronsky; two people whose intense, complicated loves are not enough to prevail over personal misunderstandings and setbacks from Russian high society. Their story is set into relief by the story of Levin, a landowner struggling with his meditations on life, love, work, religion...All of this Tolstoy deals with insightfully and with an engaging wit. The parallel stories were equally absorbing, and the tragedy of the eponymous heroine particularly moving. I believed absolutely in each of the main characters (perhaps with the exception of Kitty, the object of Levin's affection), whose virtues, vices and internal reflections are described with remarkable depth and empathy. My only criticism is that the last section is something of an anticlimax to an otherwise captivating read.

I can't comment on the comparative merits of this version, as it is the only one I have read, but I found it very fluid and bright, and I will certainly choose Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation of "War and Peace" when I get round to reading it.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was disappointed because the copy I downloaded is written in US 'English'. As an English teacher, I find this extremely irritating and it marred my reading experience. I am not reviewing Tolstoy's imaginative prose but the Kindle copy I bought (in error!) I should appreciate guidance as to how to avoid this happening for future downloads.

Thank you,

Drina Parker
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Format: Paperback
"Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way"

- Leo Tolstoy "Anna Karenina"

Anna Karenina is a beautifully written novel about three families: the Oblonskys, the Levins, and the Karenins. The first line (one of the most famous in literature) hints at Tolstoy's own views about happy and unhappy marriages having these same three families also represent three very different societal and physical locations in Russia in addition to distinctly different views on love, loyalty, fidelity, happiness and marital bliss.

Tolstoy seems to stress that `trusting companionships" are more durable and filled with happiness versus "romantic passion" that bursts with flames and then slowly; leaves ashes rather than a firm, solid foundation to build upon.

It is like reading a soap opera with all of its twists and turns where the observer is allowed to enter into the homes, the minds and the spirits of its main characters. The moral compass in the book belongs to Levin whose life and courtship of Kitty mirrors much of Leo Tolstoy's own courtship of his wife Sophia. Levin's personality and spiritual quest is Tolstoy's veiled attempt at bringing to life his own spiritual peaks and valleys and the self doubts that plagued him his entire life despite his happy family life and the fact that he too found love in his life and a committed durable marriage. At the other end of the spectrum is Anna, who also because of her individual choices and circumstances, falls into despair.

It is clear that Tolstoy wants the reader to come away with many messages about the sanctity of marriage, love and family life.
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