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Anna Karenina (film tie-in) Paperback – 6 Sep 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 85 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Film tie-in ed edition (6 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141391898
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141391892
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 896,546 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"One of the greatest love stories in world literature."
--Vladimir Nabokov --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Hardcover.

From the Back Cover

Part of the beautifully presented 'Wonders of the World' series. Translated and edited by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.

'I am writing a novel,' Tolstoy informed his friend the critic Nikolai Strakhov on 11 May 1873, referring to the book that was to become Anna Karenina. 'I've been at it for more than a month now and the main lines are traced out. This novel is truly a novel, the first in my life ...' From the Introduction. --Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

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Format: Paperback
(n.b This review refers to the Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translation).
I'll keep this review quite short, as there are plenty of others detailing just why this is regarded as one of the all-time great novels.

As this was my first experience of reading Tolstoy, I had been slightly daunted by the literary (and literal!) weight of this novel. Happily, I found that "Anna Karenina" was instantly accessible, in terms of both narrative and style.

The story is a classic tale of a tragic love affair between the beautiful, highly-strung Anna - one of the most complex and authentic portrayals of female psychology in literature - and the passionate, ambitious Count Vronsky; two people whose intense, complicated loves are not enough to prevail over personal misunderstandings and setbacks from Russian high society. Their story is set into relief by the story of Levin, a landowner struggling with his meditations on life, love, work, religion...All of this Tolstoy deals with insightfully and with an engaging wit. The parallel stories were equally absorbing, and the tragedy of the eponymous heroine particularly moving. I believed absolutely in each of the main characters (perhaps with the exception of Kitty, the object of Levin's affection), whose virtues, vices and internal reflections are described with remarkable depth and empathy. My only criticism is that the last section is something of an anticlimax to an otherwise captivating read.

I can't comment on the comparative merits of this version, as it is the only one I have read, but I found it very fluid and bright, and I will certainly choose Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation of "War and Peace" when I get round to reading it.
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Format: Paperback
I bought this before going on holiday, more as a challenge than anything else- to get through it and then tick it off my list of Classic Books.

What a surprise- it's rich, lively, and still feels freshly-crafted. Moves along at a good pace. It's grand but not aloof, and very enjoyable. As you'd expect, it's packed with deep insights about men, women, the human condition, etc.

This translation makes it accessible, brings it into the 21st Century. The main themes and the characters come across superbly well as they presumably do in the original Russian.

Yes there are some big-picture philosophical ramblings about God and faith but they don't break the stride of the narrative and indeed work well as part of the story.

A tip: Wait till you've read the book before reading the introduction as although it has some nice extra background on the book, it does give away the ending.

Full marks to author and translators!
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Format: Paperback
"Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way"

- Leo Tolstoy "Anna Karenina"

Anna Karenina is a beautifully written novel about three families: the Oblonskys, the Levins, and the Karenins. The first line (one of the most famous in literature) hints at Tolstoy's own views about happy and unhappy marriages having these same three families also represent three very different societal and physical locations in Russia in addition to distinctly different views on love, loyalty, fidelity, happiness and marital bliss.

Tolstoy seems to stress that `trusting companionships" are more durable and filled with happiness versus "romantic passion" that bursts with flames and then slowly; leaves ashes rather than a firm, solid foundation to build upon.

It is like reading a soap opera with all of its twists and turns where the observer is allowed to enter into the homes, the minds and the spirits of its main characters. The moral compass in the book belongs to Levin whose life and courtship of Kitty mirrors much of Leo Tolstoy's own courtship of his wife Sophia. Levin's personality and spiritual quest is Tolstoy's veiled attempt at bringing to life his own spiritual peaks and valleys and the self doubts that plagued him his entire life despite his happy family life and the fact that he too found love in his life and a committed durable marriage. At the other end of the spectrum is Anna, who also because of her individual choices and circumstances, falls into despair.

It is clear that Tolstoy wants the reader to come away with many messages about the sanctity of marriage, love and family life.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
"Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." That line opens and sets the tone of "Anna Karenina," a tangled and tragic tale of nineteenth century Russia. Tolstoy's story of lovers and family is interlaced with razor-sharp social commentary and odd moments that are almost transcendent. In other words, this is a masterpiece.

When Stepan Oblonsky has an affair with the governess, his wife says that she's leaving him, and now the family is about to disintegrate. Stepan's sister Anna arrives to smooth over their marital problems, and consoles his wife Dolly until she agrees to stay. But on the train there, she met the outspoken Countess Vronsky, and the countess's dashing son, who is semi-engaged to Dolly's sister Kitty.

Anna and Vronsky start to fall in love -- despite the fact that Anna has been married for ten years, to a wealthy husband she doesn't care about, and has a young son. Even so, Anna rejects her loveless marriage and becomes the center of scandal and public hypocrisy, and even becomes pregnany by Vronsky. As she prepares to jump ship and get a divorce, Anna becomes a victim of her own passions...

That isn't the entire story, actually -- Tolstoy weaves in other plots, about disintegrating families, new marriages, and the melancholy Levin's constant search for God, truth, and goodness. Despite the grim storyline about adultery, and the social commentary, there's an almost transcendent quality to some of Tolstoy's writing. It's the most optimistic tragic book I've ever read.

For some reason, Tolstoy called this his "first novel," even though he had already written some before that. Perhaps it's because "Anna Karenina" tackles so many questions and themes, and does so without ever dropping the ball.
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