Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99
includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Angel's Cut by [Knox, Elizabeth]
Kindle App Ad

The Angel's Cut Kindle Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Length: 464 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"Knox is a writer with a gift for describing the colour of the present moment...she lets her language breathe, lets it speak in revelations rather than explanations" (Times Literary Supplement)

"Her words have the power to dazzle" (Independent)

"Knox's evocation of thirties California is dreamy, and her characters interestingly warped" (Emma Hagestadt Independent)

Review

"Knox's evocation of Thirties California is dreamy, and her characters, interestingly warped." (The Independent)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 838 KB
  • Print Length: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital (10 Nov. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0035OC812
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #400,673 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sequel to The Vintner's Luck, which I adore and am now eager to reread. The Angel's Cut, unlike the earlier novel, is told predominantly from the point of view of unwinged angel Xas (though there are other, more human and equally compelling narrators), and Xas is distinctly different, preternatural, strange. The multiple voices triangulate Xas's experience of the world, showing us the strangeness of his everyday behaviour (walking like a drunkard, each step a caught fall) and the invisibility of his inner turmoil.

Sobran, Xas's true love, is long-dead, and Xas -- following a brief career as navigator on a German airship in World War I -- winds up in California, in the nascent Hollywood film industry. He's drawn to fascinatingly broken people: to eccentric producer and aviator Conrad Cole (perhaps modelled on Howard Hughes); to Flora MacLeod who's survived a horrific accident and endures chronic pain with grace and style; to Millie Cotton, woman of colour and stunt pilot who has a sense of which jobs to take and which to leave.

Xas is also pursued by his nemesis / brother Lucifer, who needs him: the nature of the compact between Xas, Lucifer and God is explored more thoroughly, and Xas's unique state explained.

The Angel's Cut is a term relating to winemaking; it refers to the portion of a barrel of wine that evaporates during ageing. The novel, though, is firmly grounded in the world of film, with discussions of the difference between conversation and dialogue, the inadequacy of flashbacks as a method of character development, the shape of a story. Flora's a film editor, and she's constantly looking for the flow, the shape of her own story: perhaps she also helps to give shape to Xas's history.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I first discovered Elizabeth Knox when I came across her novel, The Vintner's Luck, at my local library (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA). I loved the book and have re-read it multiple times. I read all her subsequent work as it was published in the U.S., and recently found out about this novel, a sequel to Vintner's, but not published (yet, I hope) in the U.S. On the basis of my passion for Knox's work, I ordered a copy from the U.K., and I was not disappointed. Knox takes us to the very lively world of Hollywood in the late 1920s and 1930s; Xas, the angel we first met in Vintner's, continues to explore the vagaries of humanity by connecting with several significant figures in the film industry. Knox is a superb writer; her language is fluid and beautiful, her characters fascinating, and her story-telling wonderfully engaging. I recommend all her books without hesitation (though you should read The Vintner's Luck before you read this one to experience the full impact of both).
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was readable but not at all in the same league as The Vintner's Luck, partly I think because of the setting. I read the aforementioned again recently and it is so utterly beguiling. The Angel's Cut tries very hard to conjure up the atmosphere of the period, 1929, 1930's and at the end 1950's briefly, but just seems to miss being evocative. The characters do not seem to have substance, I kept forgetting who was who and did what. And Xas, well, he fluttered and fell, appeared and disappeared, and it didn't really matter.
Read The Angel's Cut and spot the difference.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Vintner's Luck was one of my favourite books so I had high hopes for this. What a disappoinment. The structure of the novel was confusing, with two central characters sharing way too many traits and having very similar names, making it hard to follow who was who. Which wouldn't have been a problem if the plot had been mmore engaging, or the writing less clumsy. There was a great deal about Hollywood film making in the early talkies era and Xas as a character felt a bit bolted on, as though Know wanted to write about Hollywood but used the idea of a sequel to the Vintner's Luck as a sales ploy. One of the hardest books to wade through I've read in a long time.
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of my favourite novels of 2011 was The Vintner's Luck by Elizabeth Knox. The story of a love affair between an Angel and a human, the Vintner's Luck is beautifully written, philosophical, moving, compelling and lyrical. It is a book I will never hesitate to recommend.

It was with some trepidation that I bought the sequel, and despite having bought it I didn't read it for a further 18 months. Finding the story complete, I didn't see how Knox could either better or equal The Vintner's Luck with a second tale, and I'm very sad to say I was right.

Following the events of that novel, the immortal angel Xas has become a pilot, so he can continue to savour the sensation of flight, life as a pilot takes him to America where he becomes a stunt pilot for the movies and we are introduced to several new characters: Flora, Millie, Conrad Cole and Conrad Crow.

These characters became the problem for me, I completely failed to feel involved with any of them and repeatedly found myself switching off entirely which made it difficult to keep up with the natural flow. There are too many Conrads and this gets confusing. I thought about abandoning the book more than once but felt sad to do so.

The two things that saved the book and kept me reading were the sequences (too few, too short) in which connections were made to Sobran and Xas's former life in France and other things from The Vintner's Luck and those sequences where Xas encounters and debates with Lucifer. These parts are really good but perhaps only amount to 5% of the novel.

This novel was super disappointing in comparison to how much I adore its predecessor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover