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Ancillary Justice: THE HUGO, NEBULA AND ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD WINNER (Imperial Radch Book 1) by [Leckie, Ann]
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Ancillary Justice: THE HUGO, NEBULA AND ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD WINNER (Imperial Radch Book 1) Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 349 customer reviews
Book 1 of 3 in Imperial Radch (3 Book Series)

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Length: 393 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

Thrilling, moving and awe-inspiring (Guardian)

Signals the arrival of a hard science fiction author who just might fill the gap left by Iain M. Banks. Ancillary Justice is a highly original novel . . . an intelligent slow-burner. Highly recommended (Independent on Sunday)

You will be truly astounded at how Leckie has fully fleshed out a universe and is asking and attempting to answer the difficult questions that many authors never even address in science fiction (Buzzfeed)

Unexpected, compelling and very cool - Ann Leckie nails it. I've never met a heroine like Breq before. I consider this a very good thing indeed (John Scalzi (Hugo Award-winning author of REDSHIRTS))

Total gamechanger. Get it, read it, wish to hell you'd written it. Ann Leckie's Ancillary Justice may well be the most important book Orbit have published in ages (Paul Graham Raven)

Establishes Leckie as an heir to Banks and Cherryh (Elizabeth Bear)

It's not every day a debut novel by an author you'd never heard of before derails your entire afternoon with its brilliance (Liz Bourke Tor.com)

Using the format of a SF military adventure blended with hints of space opera, Leckie explores the expanded meaning of human nature and the uneasy balance between individuality and membership in a group identity. Leckie is a newcomer to watch (Library Journal (starred review))

Leckie's novel cast of characters serves her well-plotted story nicely. This is an altogether promising debut (Kirkus)

Our #1 pick for the year's best science fiction or fantasy book . . . this Iain M. Banks-esque tale was the book that made us most excited about the future of science fiction in 2013 (io9.com)

It engages, it excites, and it challenges the way the reader views our world. Leckie may be a former Secretary of the Science Fiction Writers of America, but she's the President of this year's crop of debut novelists. Ancillary Justice might be the best science fiction novel of this very young decade (Justin Landon Staffer's Book Review)

The sort of book that the Clarke Award wishes it had last year ... be prepared to see Ancillary Justice bandied around a lot come awards season. (As it should be) (Jared Shurin Pornokitsch)

Leckie uses familiar set pieces-an expansionist galaxy-spanning empire, a protagonist on a single-minded quest for justice-to transcend space-opera conventions in innovative ways. This impressive debut succeeds in making Breq a protagonist readers will invest in, and establishes Leckie as a talent to watch closely (Publisher's Weekly)

Leckie's debut gives casual and hardcore sci-fi fans alike a wonderful read (RT Book Reviews)

First rate, rollicking space-opera with plenty of action, intrigue and adventure ... a fabulous debut (The Skiffy and Fanty Show)

A sharply written space opera . . . tackling ideas about politics and gender in a way that's both engaging and provacative . . . a gripping read that's well worth a look (Saxon Bullock SFX Magazine)

From the Inside Flap

The record-breaking debut novel that won every major science fiction award in 2014, Ancillary Justice is the story of a warship trapped in a human body and her search for revenge. Ann Leckie is the first author to win the Arthur C. Clarke, the Nebula and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in the same year.

They made me kill thousands, but I only have one target now.

The Radch are conquerors to be feared - resist and they'll turn you into a 'corpse soldier' - one of an army of dead prisoners animated by a warship's AI mind. Whole planets are conquered by their own people.

The colossal warship called The Justice of Toren has been destroyed - but one ship-possessed soldier has escaped the devastation. Used to controlling thousands of hands, thousands of mouths, The Justice now has only two hands, and one mouth with which to tell her tale.

But one fragile, human body might just be enough to take revenge against those who destroyed her.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1395 KB
  • Print Length: 393 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (1 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BU1DG1S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 349 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #5,575 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

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Breq Ghaiad has a secret. She used to be part of a bigger entity, a ship (the space kind), called Justice of Toren. It gets more mind-boggling - she used to also be part of a hive mind AI that controlled the "corpse soldiers" on the ship, so-called because they were reanimated from the dead bodies of soldiers that the Radch empire (a dictatorial and all-powerful government on a mission to subjugate all surrounding planets) conquered or "annexed". As a battle starship, it means she is able to be anywhere and everywhere that each of her fellow ancillaries are. That gives her a certain omniscience in any action (at least when she recounts past events when she was still whole), that is really quite spectacular, and described in several instances and in colourful detail in the book.

Now she is just a remnant of the ship, and the lone soldier from the whole troop called One Esk. Out of that contingent, she was One Esk Nineteen, to be exact. Once the reader gets used to the mental gymnastics need to grasp the main character, the rest of the action flows quite smoothly and reels you in quite effortlessly. How she became just one remnant is something that unfolds, even as she encounters someone familiar, naked and face down in the snow, on an isolated planet far from the reaches of the Radchaai empire, and therefore considered uncivilised. That someone turns out to be Seivarden Vendaai, a lieutenant of the Justice (Breq the ship) a thousand years ago. In an unlikely partnership, the two embark on Breq's quest to confront the person who was responsible for her current state, and to resolve an action she had to carry out against her will twenty years ago.
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Another new-to-me female sci-fi author from my 2016 reading list who pleasantly surprised me. This was my last read of the year and definitely one of my favourites.

As well as being a compelling story of galactic-level politics and intrigue, this novel is also a very clever reflection on how we define personal identity, highlights the fact that gender is a massive issue in our own world's cultures and explores how language affects the way people communicate. It also has an interesting slant on AI that I've not read a fiction like before.

I won't say too much more because I think this is a book best picked up blind on the specifics, but suffice to say that you won't regret it.
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The good - the use of the female pronoun for practically everyone was interesting, the hive mind and last one left from the hive was great. The author enjoys politics and double dealing - quite complex and not easy to follow but I wrote some of it out and I think it's logical.
The bad - all the coincidences - arrives in the capital planet and bumps into people she knows all over the place, runs away to escape and bumps into ... The editing is iffy too (the "palace proper" turns up half a dozen times in only a few pages). I won't bother with the others, but if you're serious about SF you should read this
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Clever, interesting, literate, low on flashy stuff but full of well realised characters and civilisations. Not a tech fest , instead a well written enjoyable, readable believable book.
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Enjoyed it immensely (shades of the Culture Novels). Find comments on the lack of gender identification as an issue puzzling since it should be clear from the outset that it is how One Esk/Radchii see it.Well paced and the switching from past to present is handled well.
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I'm still reading this but the next two are top of my to get list, and i'm having to slow myself down to prolong it. Stunningly good read.
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By Kate TOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Breq is unique but she wasn't always. Once Breq was a spaceship, Justice of Toren, comprising thousands of corpse soldiers, each with a shared identity, one of many such vessels spreading the influence of the Imperial Radch around the Galaxy. Breq is now alone, her vessel destroyed, and she has only one goal - to take vengeance on Anaander Mianaai, the lord of the Radch, who exists in an almost infinite number of forms. Breq is also our narrator and it is through these strange eyes, this unusual perspective, that we witness the events that brought Breq to her single-minded purpose.

Ancillary Justice is an unusual novel, reflecting the nature of its narrator. Breq has lived in one form or another for thousands of years but in many ways she is socially naive. This expresses itself in her language. She can communicate with most races but not necessarily correctly. She doesn't readily know gender pronouns; everyone is `she' unless Breq is corrected. This has the rather peculiar result that we are not sure whether we are being introduced to men or women and, as we work this out, there are surprises. However, for me, this reinforced how little gender can matter when a story's narrator has far more basic identity problems to solve. While this use of the `she' pronoun has been an issue for some readers, it mattered little to me and I enjoyed the rare excuses for humour that it provided to the novel.

The novel opens on an icy planet with a moment of inexplicable mercy by Breq. She finds Seivarden lying in the snow, close to death. Seivarden had once been one of Breq's human crew members, many hundreds of years before, and there is no reason for her to be there, let alone still alive.
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