FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Amulet Of Samarkand (... has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Crazy Coyote
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: BRAND NEW DISPATCHED BY AMAZON
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Amulet Of Samarkand (The Bartimaeus Sequence) Paperback – 2 Sep 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 130 customer reviews

See all 33 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£0.82 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£7.99 FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10. Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • The Amulet Of Samarkand (The Bartimaeus Sequence)
  • +
  • The Golem's Eye (The Bartimaeus Sequence)
  • +
  • Ptolemy's Gate (The Bartimaeus Sequence)
Total price: £23.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi Childrens; paperback / softback edition (2 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552562793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552562799
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.1 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (130 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Amazon Review

Author Jonathan Stroud delivers such a potent and unforgettable mix of magic, history and intrigue with The Amulet of Samarkand, the first part of his compelling Bartimaeus Trilogy, that it is difficult not to want to read the next novel immediately. Undoubtedly the shortest 480 pages you'll ever read, The Amulet of Samarkand is a superb novel of revenge and adventure with the most original central character for years.

Bartimaeus is a wisecracking Djinni (pronounced "Jinnee" we're reliably informed) unlike no other. Summoned from some otherworldly place to do the bidding of a pipsqueak trainee magician called Nathanial, he sets about his given task reluctantly but with aplomb. Nathanial is after revenge and that makes him dangerous. Previously humiliated by a powerful magician called Simon Lovelace in front of his impotent master, Nathanial has spent every waking hour for years cramming knowledge of the highest magic into his head so that he can exact his own special kind of vengeance.

Bartimaeus is charged to steal a precious and powerful object--the Amulet of Samarkand--from Lovelace's residence, which the Djinni achieves but not without angering a few old mates on the same astral plane and having to spend the night annoyingly disguised as a bird. Bartimaeus, despite being bound to Nathaniel, discovers the boy's real name--a tool he can use to his own advantage. But he is constantly outwitted. Then an overriding danger becomes apparent that threatens the whole fabric of society and they must work together to combat it.

Stroud's fantasy world is familiar, yet fascinatingly different. It's almost Victorian London, yet Magicians hold overall power and inhabit parliament. The writing is captivating, the story intelligent and mesmerising. It's difficult to imagine a more scintillating collection of characters and situations. Unmissable. (Recommended for ages 10 and over.) --John McLay --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Drama, humour and hypnotically engaging storytelling" (Independent)

"The truly original touch is the way Stroud alternates Nathaniel's story with the djinni's own knowing and irascible first-person narrative" (Guardian)

"The narrative slips skilfully from first person to third and back and Bartimaeus's voice is laugh-out-loud sassy, while Nathaniel's story has an engaging poignancy as he tries to prove himself in a world in which he has always been despised" (The Sunday Times)

"Not since Gulliver's Travels has a children's writer managed to combine a thrilling tale of magic and adventure with such deliciously pointed comedy" (The Times)

"Terrific stuff" (Mail on Sunday)

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The first part of The Bartimaeus Trilogy, "The Amulet of Samarkand" is set in a mostly recognisable London - admittedly, with a few noticeable changes. The Tower of London is still a feared prison and the Empire (which still exists) is at war with the Czech Republic. Magicians are the ruling class, holding all positions of power, while the non-magical human masses are referred to as commoners. Indeed, the Prime Minister is described at one point as a rather vain magician whose speciality is Charm - though he rarely bothers even with that nowadays. Clearly - ahem - that has no basis in reality at all. These magicians derive their power from their ability to summon and control a variety of demons - for example, afrits, djinn and imps.
The book begins with the first summoning of a djinn called Bartimaeus by a magician's apprentice called Nathaniel. Nathaniel orders the Bartimaeus to steal the Amulet of Samarkand from a very powerful magician and minister called Simon Lovelace. One thing leads to another and, sooner than you can say "N'gorso the Mighty", there's murder, mystery and mayhem - with the added bonus of some young and mysterious human revolutionaries. Needless to say, Lovelace is at the heart of the wrongdoing and the Amulet is clearly at the crux of his dastardly plans.
Nathaniel and Bartimaeus are the story's central characters and the focus of the story alternates back and forth between them. As things progress, we learn more about both our heroes - for example, how Nathaniel came to be a magician's apprentice, why he's picking on Simon Lovelace and a little about Bartimaeus' former masters.
Stroud has taken an interesting approach - he writes Nathaniel's story ("Nathaniel's eyes narrowed"), but the djinni tells his own ("I sat on the ground cross-legged").
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love the imaginative story line and the great way Stroud tells it. He writes in a funny, light and rhythmic way.
I really wish he would continue Bartimaeus' adventures for a long time!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 3 Oct. 2003
Format: Hardcover
I am not a huge reader (perhaps 1 or 2 book a year) but when I was passed The Amulet of Samarkand I found it difficult to put down. As soon as I started to read the opening chapters I became immediately absorbed into the story. I felt that the opening pace is well maintained throughout the book which kept me wanting to read 'just one more chapter'. Jonathan Stroud has got the ability to give descriptions which enable you imagine you are seeing, at first hand, all the action - of which there is plenty.
The subject matter is not my usual choice but I felt the combination of fantasy with the reality of possible secret 'goings on' in parliament worked well together.
I feel that the book is aimed at teenagers aswell as adults providing entertainment on different levels dependant on the reader. The use of footnotes is not something that I have experienced in a novel before but they provide some great insights into the characters and their history and are very amusing - so don't miss them out.
Essentially the story is about a young magician (Nathaniel) who seeks revenge on an adult magician (Simon Lovelace) who has made fun of him....oh yes and who also wants to overthrow the Prime Minister. Nathaniel needs to use the powers of a djinni (Bartimaeus) to do his bidding and get revenge upon the magician. This leads both of them into all sorts of trouble which is why the book moves along at such a rapid pace.
I would recommend this book to anyone 10 years old and above and would hope you get as much enjoyment out of it as I did.
Can't wait for the next book!!!!!
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 3 Oct. 2003
Format: Hardcover
There has been a lot of hype surrounding this book and when I opened it, I have to admit I was a little cynical; it was hard to read it without constantly analysing "Is this book really worth £2 million?" But soon I stopped caring. The book had me gripped from start to finish. Cleverly structured, it alternates between the first-person viewpoint of a djinni and Nathaniel, a young magician who sets out to take revenge on Simon Lovelace. The characters are brilliantly drawn and by setting up a conflict between Nathaniel and Lovelace, the author sets the stage for a wonderful battle of mighty opposites...
In terms of imagination, this book far outstrips Harry Potter. I recognised some of the magical background in the novel, having read the odd text myself out of interest, and one senses that the author did plenty of careful research - the result is that, though the book is a fantasy, there is a sense of versimilitude and even in its wierdest moments it remains convincing. In terms of character depth and insight, I thought this surpassed HP5; Nathaniel is a far more convincing angry adolescent than HP.
Above all, the author has an elegant, seductive, intelligent prose style. Maybe this isn't as amazing as Pullman, but it comes close and I cannot wait to read the rest of the triology.
This book deserves the hype!
Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
5 Stars

One of the best books that I have ever read.

When Nathaniel, a fast learning magicians apprentice, tries to get one back at his enemy, Simon Lovelace, for humiliating and beating him at a meeting(for being a bit too clever) a few years ago, he doesn't realize who he's fighting with.

He summons a very high ranking spirit, a fourteenth level Djinni, Bartimaeus; he orders it to steal a very precious item from the magician, the Amulet of Samarkand.

Lovelace becomes furious and suddenly Nathaniel and Bartimaeus are plunged into a bloody, murderous adventure full of excitement.

I am a 12 year old boy who loves the fantasy and fiction kind of books. I got this book for Christmas last year and was contemplating whether I should read it or not, I wasn't sure what to do for I have loads of books that I could read. In the end I decided that I would try it out...

...That book was absolutely AMAZING! The plot was a very well thought out and exciting one. The author has made the accounts told from two very different sides of the story and I thought that that was very cleverly done. The footnotes are great, sometimes even hilarious. The mix of wit and hilarity goes perfectly. The writing is very imaginative and clever.

As soon as I finished this book I found myself turning the first page of the next book, The Golems Eye.

I recommend this book to anyone of any age, especially young people who love fantasy.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews