Buy Used
£5.00
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by jeremydore
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used but in good condition
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Amor and Psyche: The psychic development of the feminine. A commentary on the tale by Apuleius Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.00
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 181 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1st edition
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691017727
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691017723
  • ASIN: B000UTGUYQ
  • Product Dimensions: 20.1 x 13.2 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,687,630 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A wicked stepmother*, ugly sisters**, impossible tasks, a sleeping princess, and, of course, Beauty and the Beast... are all ingredients of 'Cupid and Psyche', an inset story in the second century AD Latin novel 'The Golden Ass' by Lucius Apuleius. And like all the best pantomimes, it ends with a wedding.

Imitations and adaptations are beyond count. To draw out one tangled skein: the Neapolitan Giambattista Basile included an "animal marriage" story, 'The Three Animal Kings', in his 'Pentamerone' (1634-36). The German "collector" J.K.A.Musäus re-told this as 'The Books of the Chronicle of the Three Sisters' (in 'Volksmärchen der Deutschen', 1782-86). In his 1801 edition of the genuine 1549 work 'The Complaynt of Scotland' John Leyden, a Scottish "collector" and assistant of Sir Walter Scott, asserted that the Musäus story was based on a Scots tale, 'The Black Bull of Norroway', the sole evidence for whose existence is a mention in the 'Complaynt' of a tale entitled (get this) 'The thre futtit dog of Norroway'. Another Scot, Robert Chambers who was a co-founder of the dictionary firm, claimed in his 1841 "collection" 'Popular Rhymes of Scotland' to have "fortunately recovered" the 'Black Bull', giving it in two different versions, both pretty obviously his own work. A third Scot, Andrew Lang, included one of these in his 1889 'Blue Fairy Book', along with TWO other variations on 'Cupid and Psyche' both "collected" by the Norwegians Asbjørnsen and Moe ('East of the Sun and West of the Moon' and 'The Princess on the Glass Hill'). 'The Blue Fairy Book' in turn was boyhood reading for... J.R.R.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Heavy dose of Jung with your Greek Mythology 12 April 2009
By Edward J. Barton - Published on Amazon.com
The first part of the book is a retelling of the story of Eros and Psyche as originally told by Apileius. The story is familiar to most followers of Greek/Roman mythology - Psyche is a beautiful princess, Eros falls in love with her, but will not allow her to see him. She is tricked into doing so, then undergoes a series of trials to regain his heart.

The second part of the book is a commentary using Jungian psychology and archetypes to discuss the deeper meanings of the myth. It is a very heavy read, but worth the effort - particularly if the reader has familiarization with Jungian thought. Not for the faint of heart...
4.0 out of 5 stars Heavy dose of Jung with your Greek Mythology 12 April 2009
By Edward J. Barton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The first part of the book is a retelling of the story of Eros and Psyche as originally told by Apileius. The story is familiar to most followers of Greek/Roman mythology - Psyche is a beautiful princess, Eros falls in love with her, but will not allow her to see him. She is tricked into doing so, then undergoes a series of trials to regain his heart.

The second part of the book is a commentary using Jungian psychology and archetypes to discuss the deeper meanings of the myth. It is a very heavy read, but worth the effort - particularly if the reader has familiarization with Jungian thought. Not for the faint of heart...
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback