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American Adulterer: From the creator of Line of Duty by [Mercurio, Jed]
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American Adulterer: From the creator of Line of Duty Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Length: 353 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Remarkable... The president's wit, courtesy, peacemaking vision and cool judgement are all here, vividly re-created, as well as courage in the face of near disabling infirmity and pain....gripping and thoughtful" (Hugo Barnacle The Sunday Times)

"Compelling. Glacially elegant prose... depicts a man who, for all his power, remains imprisoned by desire" (Adrian Turpin Financial Times)

"He writes in brilliantly clinical prose...His real success is here is to highlight how JFK moved politics into a culture of celebrity...Mercurio finds a truth in JFK through fiction" (Ben East Metro)

"Mercurio ought to be applauded for the boldness of his project...The Cuban Missile Crisis is brilliantly, claustrophobically handled, and the treatment of the president's tragically premature son Joseph so riveted me that I found my head reluctantly buried in the book as I walked down the street and bumped into things" (Archie Bland Independent)

"American Adulterer is a novel of our times: shameless and prurient, detached and salacious" (Sean O'Hagan The Observer)

Review

`American Adulterer is a novel of our times: shameless and prurient, detached and salacious.'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 718 KB
  • Print Length: 353 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital (15 Feb. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004EYSY9M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #129,069 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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3.9 out of 5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Recommended by a friend I thoroughly enjoyed it and now recommend it to my friends
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent. Poignant. Unusual.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
American Adulterer is a terrific insight into the world of JFK - once you can get past the fact/fiction mix. Mercurio tells the story from the point of view of 'the subject' the subject being JFK and clearly uses a certain amount of fiction to wind around the facts he delivers thereby producing an absorbing read with proper turn-the-page quality that we have come to expect from this writer. An ambitious book that delivers on all levels - you really won't be disappointed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can't add much to the other 4 and 5 star reviews other than to say that if you are interested in JFK, recent American history and politics, this is a fascinating, mostly fictional (factional?) examination of the contradictions and conflicted inner life of the man and his incredible abilitiy to compartmentalise almost incompatible drives. That he survived as long as he did is amazing, given his appetites and pharmacological intake. An addictive read.
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By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Mar. 2010
Format: Hardcover
Mercurio's "analytic" study of the physical side - both medical and erotic - of John Kennedy's life is quite interesting. It's "fiction", but with a healthy dose of actual facts about Kennedy, his marriage, and his Presidency. Mercurio writes with a "removed" voice; he's presenting his story of Kennedy as he would a scientific study of a man - conflicted in so many ways - as a "subject" of a report.

John Kennedy was a man with almost ingrained carnal urges, that were not satisfied within the bounds of marriage. Early in his life, he recognised that he would always have sexual needs. He married Jacqueline Bouvier - herself the daughter of a charming philanderer - who seemed to be the only woman he was interested in maintaining an out-of-bed relationship with. He expected her to go along with his blatant bedding of other women and she appeared to do so, occasionally even seeming to abet the deeds by giving him the room and time he needed to make conquests. Of course, that quid-pro-quo didn't come cheaply as her often insane spending on furniture, clothes, jewelry and other personal items suggest a passive/aggressive relationship with her husband.

Kennedy also had many physical frailties, some evident from childhood and others obtained during difficult war-time service in the Pacific. He had a staff of doctors at the White House, who were often at odds with each other over the on-going treatment of his Addison's Disease, back injuries, and other ailments, which often kept him in physical agony. And, then, there was of course, "Dr Feelgood", given the nickname by those patients - including Kennedy and his wife - to whom he gave injections of feel-good narcotics to keep going.
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Format: Paperback
A very interesting perspective on the Kennedy years. Mercurio's novel takes the form of a doctor's report of a subject and all his illnesses, including his out of control sex drive. It's by no means dry, slipping deftly into novel form to make the 'report' come to life. So not only do we have a fascinating catalogue of JFK's illnesses and afflictions and the impact they have on his daily life but also details of his tumultuous love life. There is a very interesting chapter on the Cuban Missile Crisis that is high intensity turned farce as Kennedy is trying to prevent the onset of World War Three and desperate for a quickie with a young intern.

The book is well worth a read as it exposes Kennedy for the man he was - a very complex and outrageous individual.

Incidentally, Kennedy's affair with Mary Meyer is dealt with but it is never revealed that she was a great friend of Timothy Leary, the LSD guru of the 60's. Nor is any mention made of her strange murder just a few months after his assassination.
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Format: Paperback
American Adulterer by Jed Mercurio ,is a novel(pardon the pun)approach to historical fiction. It takes a well known figure,John Kennedy,and treats him as a medical subject. We are then given a guided tour of his medical history from his election to his death. We are also provided with insight into his mind, particularly why he felt the need to have sex outside his marriage.

The picture we get is not a pleasant one. You get the feeling that Kennedy did not have a high regard for women. He reminds me of Dan Draper from Mad Men,women as disposable entities apart from his wife. The section with regard to his use of Fiddle, Fiddle and Fuddle make you cringe.His sexual needs seemed to matter more than any feelings towards these women. The role of President, gave Kennedy rich opportunities to satisfy his sexual thirst, which was considerable. The only woman that he had any genuine feelings for was Jackie,his wife and mother of his children.

The writer also describes Kennedy's relationships with Frank Sinatra, Marilyn Monroe,Mary Meyer and Curtis Le May. Future President Bill Clinton even makes an appearance!

We are reminded that Kennedy was also under constant medical treatment from his team of doctors. He was beset by an array of ailments from Addison's Disease,constipation, allergies and his back. The amount of drugs that he was ingesting was staggering. Would he have survived as President if the public knew his real medical history? Clearly, he was a very sick man.

Having said that, the writer does stress the humanity of the man. I defy you not to be moved by chapter that deals with the death of his son, Patrick. Very moving.

If I have one criticism,it is that Robert Kennedy is not mentioned at all.
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