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Alwyn: Chamber Music CD

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Conductor: -
  • Composer: William Alwyn
  • Audio CD (26 July 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B003RCFCRY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 138,994 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Clarinet Sonata - Robert Plane
  2. Oboe Sonata - Sarah Francis
  3. Viola Sonatina - Sarah-Jane Bradley
  4. Suite for Oboe and Harp - Sarah Francis/Lucy Wakeford
  5. String Trio - Hermitage String Trio
  6. Conversations - Various Performers

Product Description

Product Description

Robert Plane, clarinette - Lucy Gould, violon - Sarah Francis, hautbois - Sarah Jane Bradley, alto - Lucy Wakefield, harpe - Sophia Rahman, piano - Hermitage String Trio

Review

Perfomances and recording both excel, with Sarah-Jane Bradley's viola-playing outstanding and Sophia Rahman's accompaniants a model of supportive expertise throughout. Performance **** Recording **** --BBC Music Magazine,Nov 2010

Alwyn's chamber music bristles with piquant ideas.Every phrase has a spark,challenging its interpreters while giving the listener a feast of gently angular lyricism.It is the clearest evidence yet that Alwyn deserves reappraisal. --Financial Times,07/08/10

A Thoughtful chamber survey reveals Alwyn's chamber craftmanship -- --Gramophone awards issue,2010

Customer Reviews

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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
William Alwyn had a wide ranging career as a composer that lasted from the early 1930's till 1980's. He is best known for the fine cycle of 5 symphonies, of which I think no less than three excellent interpretations are available -- by himself (Lyrita), Richard Hickox (Chandos) and David Lloyd-Jones (Naxos). However, unlike say Walton who composed very little outside his major works ,Alwyn wrote over three hundred works, including two operas (which I have not heard), a good deal of orchestral and film music and not a little chamber music.

This composer always had a very individual voice, but it was always in constant evolution. He had a tendency to take an existing style and develop it it a totally unorthodox direction. No more is this so than in the fine Pastoral Fantasia, written just before the Second World War for viola and orchestra. You listen to the opening bars of the viola and think: "Oh yes another not very good imitation of RVW in Pastoral mood"; and then you get to the end and realize that the music has summoned up up some totally different inner landscape that is quite unique. Personally in the case of the Pastoral Fantasia I think it is due to the French poetry that Alwyn loved hovering in the background, but one cannot prove such things. Anyway this argument could be applied to much of his music. His earlier work was often fresh and lyrical in an English way, but with French overtones. His work after say 1950 is equally sonorous, but there is an increasing tendency to inner drama and debate between instruments that owes perhaps something to Berg or Bartok , but remains stubbornly individual and English. However, Alwyn's music of whatever period is very listenable to.
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