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Alive: The True Story of the Andes Survivors: The Story of the Andes Survivors (A Mandarin paperback) Paperback – 5 Nov 1992

4.6 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow; New edition edition (5 Nov. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749314508
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749314507
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.7 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,015,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"A GREAT BOOK ... AN INCREDIBLE SAGA. Read's accomplishment in recording a struggle both physical and spiritual is superb."-- "Philadelphia Inquirer""THIS BOOK WILL EXCITE YOU, shock you, at times revolt you, but you are not likely to forget it."-- "John Barkham Reviews""A classic in the literature of survival."-- "Newsweek" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Perfect for fans of Channel 4 award-winning drama series Lost, this remarkable book tells the true story of what it's like to be the lost, desperate and starving survivors of a tragic plane crash... Adapted into a film starring Ethan Hawke and John Malkovich, this is an epic story of survival against all the odds. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have read many books of mountains and survival, it's a genre I find interesting, but there are four books that stand out as being "5* - love it" level. Alive by Piers Paul Read is one of them.

It's somehow hard to review, as there are two elements - the events themselves and the book of the events. I find the actual events of the 1972 Andes plane crash, and how 16 of the passengers came to survive the 2+ months they spent in the mountains, utterly fascinating. I have watched and read everything I can find on it - documentaries, the film, books, articles. I have enormous respect for those involved.

Turning to this book, it is highly detailed, well written, covers many perspectives. It is not (in my opinion) perfect. It is at times a little long and can be dry - although as I am so fascinated by the events I enjoyed the level of detail. Also from other things I've read, the survivors themselves felt it painted a slightly critical picture of two of them. But on the other side, it was a great telling of the story - following both the survivors and also their families at home & how they were involved in the search for the wreckage. A great combination of recounting both the facts and conveying the emotions and spirit of those involved.
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Format: Paperback
An epic of human spirit, endurance and endeavour against the elements, desperation and death.
What is a little suprising is that even in the face of the most inhuman circumstances some still found humour. A true story of amazing solidarity and faith in themselves and humanity.
I read it in three days and couldn't put it down.
If you have Google Earth, take a look at the terrain using the tilt feature...it is truly an amazing achievment.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book soon after watching the 1993 movie, Alive. The novel is a well written account of the survival of 16 Uruguayan boys from a plane crash in the Andes in October, 1972. The author didn't dramatise or sensationalise the despair of the group and the bravery of some (it was unnecessary), instead it comes across as an objective account of the people involved in the plane crash. I enjoyed the parts about Uruguayan culture -- how family and religion are predominant, how their parents (the fathers organizing more searches and mothers seeking clairvoyants and religious miracles) were involved in the rescue long after the governments of Chile and Uruguay had given up. The movie did not show this side of the story at all.
The boys themselves had their own sort of society in that valley in the Andes -- not everyone was helpful or had the instinct for survival and none of them had ever been through this kind of hardship, but they made it work and their system kept 16 of them alive for 72 days. They had their share of so much bad luck (not knowing where they were, the expeditionaries took a longer/harder route to civilisation; their parents had the right idea of their location a few times but looked elsewhere) and some good luck (they did not lose a single boy in their many expeditions). What got them through was a mixture of hope, love for their families, resourcefulness and extreme stubborness -- all of which are admirable qualities and make their story worth telling.
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Format: Paperback
Time has not diminished the drama of the tale of the Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes mountains. Of the forty five people on the plane at the time of the crash, sixteen came down from the mountain about seventy days later with a saga of survival not easily forgotten.
Theirs is a journey born of tragedy and human endurance. The author unfolds a tale that is gripping in the telling, as enthralling as it is almost unbelievable. It is investigative reporting at its best, because it does not fail to convey the human drama and pathos behind the story of this remarkable struggle for survival high up in the Andes mountains. Masterfully written, it is a well balanced narrative that takes great pains to ground the experience of the survivors in the context out of which it arose.
The plane had crashed in the Andes mountains on Argentinian territory. It was an exercise in terror for those on the plane, as it barreled down the mountain, before finally coming to rest in a valley of snow high up in the Andes. Of the forty five persons on board, thirty two had initially survived the crash. Some, however, had sustained serious injuries. Time would not be their friend. Moreover, with little warm clothing (keep in mind that October is springtime in South America), the survivors were exposed to the extreme cold of the night air, high up in the Andes mountains. Though spring, this still meant temperatures well below freezing. Damp, cold, and hungry, amid the anguished cries of the injured, thus began the first of many such nights.
By their tenth day in the Andes, the limited food supplies, which they had rationed with all the care of a miser, had virtually run out. Starving and ravenously hungry, they voiced what they all knew to be true, but had not dared to voice before.
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By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Jan. 2003
Format: Paperback
Time has not diminished the drama of the tale of the Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes Mountains. Of the forty five people on the plane at the time of the crash, sixteen came down from the mountain about seventy days later with a saga of survival not easily forgotten.
Theirs is a journey born of tragedy and human endurance. The author unfolds a tale that is gripping in the telling, as enthralling as it is almost unbelievable. It is investigative reporting at its best, because it does not fail to convey the human drama and pathos behind the story of this remarkable struggle for survival high up in the Andes Mountains. Masterfully written, it is a well balanced narrative that takes great pains to ground the experience of the survivors in the context out of which it arose.
The plane had crashed in the Andes Mountains on Argentinian territory. It was an exercise in terror for those on the plane, as it barreled down the mountain, before finally coming to rest in a valley of snow high up in the Andes. Of the forty five persons on board, thirty two had initially survived the crash. Some, however, had sustained serious injuries. Time would not be their friend. Moreover, with little warm clothing (keep in mind that October is springtime in South America), the survivors were exposed to the extreme cold of the night air, high up in the Andes. Though spring, this still meant temperatures well below freezing. Damp, cold, and hungry, amid the anguished cries of the injured, thus began the first of many such nights.
By their tenth day in the Andes, the limited food supplies, which they had rationed with all the care of a miser, had virtually run out. Starving and ravenously hungry, they voiced what they all knew to be true, but had not dared to voice before.
Read more ›
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