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Alex's Wake: A Voyage of Betrayal and Journey of Remembrance Audio CD – Audiobook, CD

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Audio CD: 720 pages
  • Publisher: HighBridge Audio; Unabridged edition (8 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1622314077
  • ISBN-13: 978-1622314072
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.4 x 14.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Product Description

Review


"Kirkus Reviews," 3/1/14
"A child of persecuted German Jews remembers his tormented, perished forebears--and makes peace with the country that hounded them to death...A well-researched, thorough reckoning of this shameful past."
"Providence Journal," 8/24/14
"Goldsmith ably personalizes the Holocaust, traveling the Auschwitz-bound arc of his grandfather and uncle, chillingly vivifying the collective camps' otherwise monolithic millions."



"Beautiful and brave...a chilling yet affirming account of human loss and recovery."--David Maraniss, author of "They Marched into Sunlight"
"The opposite of love, Elie Wiesel has observed, is not hate but indifference. With Alex's Wake, the author proves himself the least indifferent and, because of that, the most loving of men."
--Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC's "Hardball"
"Underscores the immense moral challenges and failings of a nation that believes itself the leader of the free world.... A heartbreaking story of fear, frustration, anti-Semitism, and betrayal."--"Baltimore Sun"
"A child of persecuted German Jews remembers his tormented, perished forebears--and makes peace with the country that hounded them to death...A well-researched, thorough reckoning of this shameful past."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"Goldsmith ably personalizes the Holocaust, traveling the Auschwitz-bound arc of his grandfather and uncle, chillingly vivifying the collective camps' otherwise monolithic millions."--"Providence Journal"



"Beautiful and brave...a chilling yet affirming account of human loss and recovery."--David Maraniss, author of "They Marched into Sunlight"
"The opposite of love, Elie Wiesel has observed, is not hate but indifference. With Alex's Wake, the author proves himself the least indifferent and, because of that, the most loving of men."
--Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC's "Hardball"
"There are six million Holocaust stories. All of them are the same in sadness and devastation. Each is different in circumstance and fear. Martin Goldsmith eloquently tells the story of his search for family in the rubble of memory and distance. It's a moving journey of finding the past and his own determined and compassionate present."--Susan Stamberg, NPR
"A new perspective on the Holocaust...powerful and evocative"--"New York Journal of Books"
"Underscores the immense moral challenges and failings of a nation that believes itself the leader of the free world.... A heartbreaking story of fear, frustration, anti-Semitism, and betrayal."--"Baltimore Sun"
"A child of persecuted German Jews remembers his tormented, perished forebears--and makes peace with the country that hounded them to death...A well-researched, thorough reckoning of this shameful past."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"Goldsmith ably personalizes the Holocaust, traveling the Auschwitz-bound arc of his grandfather and uncle, chillingly vivifying the collective camps' otherwise monolithic millions."--"Providence Journal"
"Profoundly moving"--"Johns Hopkins Magazine"

Beautiful and bravea chilling yet affirming account of human loss and recovery. David Maraniss, author of "They Marched into Sunlight"
The opposite of love, Elie Wiesel has observed, is not hate but indifference. With Alex s Wake, the author proves himself the least indifferent and, because of that, the most loving of men.
Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC s "Hardball"
"There are six million Holocaust stories. All of them are the same in sadness and devastation. Each is different in circumstance and fear. Martin Goldsmith eloquently tells the story of his search for family in the rubble of memory and distance. It's a moving journey of finding the past and his own determined and compassionate present."Susan Stamberg, NPR
"A new perspective on the Holocaust...powerful and evocative""New York Journal of Books"
Underscores the immense moral challenges and failings of a nation that believes itself the leader of the free world. A heartbreaking story of fear, frustration, anti-Semitism, and betrayal. "Baltimore Sun"
A child of persecuted German Jews remembers his tormented, perished forebearsand makes peace with the country that hounded them to deathA well-researched, thorough reckoning of this shameful past. "Kirkus Reviews"
Goldsmith ably personalizes the Holocaust, traveling the Auschwitz-bound arc of his grandfather and uncle, chillingly vivifying the collective camps otherwise monolithic millions. "Providence Journal"
"Profoundly moving""Johns Hopkins Magazine"
Blogcritics.org, 4/26/15
[A] heartbreaking accountA harrowing taleA book with a lesson for today.
"New York Daily News," 4/15/15
With painstaking detail and a historical biography, Goldsmith digs deep into his own history and the psyche of Eastern European Jewry.
BookTrib.com, 4/15/15
[An] intensely personal story.
"Association of Jewish Libraries Reviews," February/March 2016
Goldsmith s well-written and well-researched account is personal and poignant.
" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Martin Goldsmith is a host and classical music programmer for Symphony Hall on Sirius XM Satellite Radio and previously hosted NPR's daily classical music program, Performance Today, from 1989 to 1999. He is the author of The Inextinguishable Symphony and lives in Maryland. AlexsWakeBook.com --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 April 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Subtitled, “A Voyage of Betrayal and a Journey of Remembrance,” this is the story of a journey. When Martin Goldsmith wrote his previous book, “The Inextinguishable Symphony,” about the lives of his parents, he found that it gave him more questions than answers. Martin Goldsmith’s musician parents had escaped Nazi Europe and fled to the United States and that first book told their story. However, Martin’s paternal grandfather, Alex Goldschmidt and his father’s younger brother, Klaus Helmut Goldschmidt, were not so lucky. This was despite being among more than nine hundred Jewish refugees, who left Germany in May 1939 aboard the ocean liner the St Louis, bound for a new life in South America. The NY Times declared it, “the saddest ship afloat today,” as, after more than a month at sea, it was unable to find a harbour to take those aboard and returned to Europe. Alex begged his son, Martin’s father, to help him and felt he did not do enough for him and his brother. Martin Goldsmith decided to retrace the steps of his grandfather and uncle and also trace his paternal family history. This is the story of that journey.

The book begins in Sachenhagen, where Martin Goldsmith found the home of his great-great-grandfather. He traces the history of his family as prosperous horse traders, the birth of Alex and his move to Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. Alex was a successful businessman, who owned a dress shop, and was respected and liked. As the author meets those that knew his grandfather and uncle, you get a sense of who these people, who had been reduced to statistics, actually were. A kindly man who reduced the price of a dress so a young girl could afford it; a bookish boy who cared for his father and became his companion.
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Format: Hardcover
Martin Goldsmith has written "Alex's Wake", the search for his grandfather and uncle, who had been two of the passengers on the "SS St Louis". The boat, which set out from Hamburg to Havana in 1939 and carrying a total of 937 Jewish passengers, who had been promised asylum in Cuba. After being turned away from landing in Cuba, the ship was also denied entry in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. After being shunted around for two weeks, the passengers were accepted by the UK, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Those passengers who ended up in the UK were the only ones who reached safety; the other three countries were occupied the following year by the Germans and the Jews there were sent to their deaths in concentration camps.

Born 10 years after his grandfather and uncle died, Martin Goldsmith was the son of the one son who reached safety in the US, along with his wife, Martin's mother. Martin was determined to honor his dead relatives by tracing their path from their home in Oldenburg, Germany, to the St Louis, and then through the French camps they were sent to before being shipped by train from Drancy to their deaths at Auschwitz. He and his wife, set off on a multi-week driving trip, beginning in Hamburg and ending up in Auschwitz and this book is an excellently written recounting of Goldsmith's thoughts and emotions in 2011 as he walked in the steps of his dead relatives.

However, while reading the book, I felt there was something missing. And that is the story of Martin's grandmother and aunt, also killed in the Holocaust. Martin begins the book in Oldenburg, Germany, where Alex Goldschmidt had built a fortune in horse trading and then in women's retail. Alex and Toni had four children, two sons and two daughters.
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