Buy Used
£33.20
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by momox co uk
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: From Europe's No.1 in used books & media articles.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Albert Renger-Patzsch: Photographs of Objectivity Hardcover – 31 Mar 1998

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£102.55 £33.20
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: MIT Press (31 Mar. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262181894
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262181891
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 2.5 x 31 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,661,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The great German photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch, who first came to prominence in the 1920s, here receives a first-rate presentation worthy of his stature. The self-professed striving for "objectivity" in Renger-Patzsch's work leads, seemingly paradoxically, to a poetic intensity only achievable by a master artist. Readers of The New Yorker may have seen, in a recent issue, a stunning photo of a snowy field broken by fencing -- that was a Renger-Patzsch, and they will want to check this book out. But everyone should. The reproductions are superb and the supporting scholarly materials are extremely informative.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The best and most comprehensive book on the work of Renger-Patzsch.

Sadly most of his work was destroyed in an American bombing raid on Frankfurt.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the world's great photographers. 27 Aug. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The great German photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch, who first came to prominence in the 1920s, here receives a first-rate presentation worthy of his stature. The self-professed striving for "objectivity" in Renger-Patzsch's work leads, seemingly paradoxically, to a poetic intensity only achievable by a master artist. Readers of The New Yorker may have seen, in a recent issue, a stunning photo of a snowy field broken by fencing -- that was a Renger-Patzsch, and they will want to check this book out. But everyone should. The reproductions are superb and the supporting scholarly materials are extremely informative.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Objectivity or Idealism? 3 Aug. 2002
By Interplanetary Funksmanship - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
German photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch insisted that his photography was merely a matter of cataloguing of material phenomena, and that it represented a "new objectivity" (Neue Sachlichkeit). He also insisted that he was simply a "recorder" of said objects.
That might strike people as odd, in this age when pretentious "post-modernists" defile Christ in urine, or actually sell cans of their own excrement to the Museum of Modern Art for tens of thousands of dollars, when *anything* and *everything* qualifies to be deemed as art, without any formal -- or toilet -- training necessary. Yet, Renger-Patzsch disdained the moniker of "artist" that his enthusiasts tried to make stick to him. I wonder if he would still have that attitude with all the literal crap that poses as art today.
Renger-Patzsch's photographs weren't merely objective, they were pure idealism, for he always arranged or composed the subjects of his photographs to be seen in their best light. Whether it was simple pictures of common items, such as hand trowels, shoe trees or foliage, his photographs had a sensuous quality to them that makes the viewer want to reach into his photographs to touch them.
He had a gift for making the commonplace beautiful and for creating gorgeous landscapes out of factory works and basalt mines. His industrial prints are contemporaneous with any of Charles Scheeler's or Margaret Bourke-White's, but bear a much subtler imprint; There is a quiet quality to his prints, in which man is either alone and isolated or conspicuously absent (as with his photographs of houses outside of Essen and Dortmund), but the handiwork of man is ever-present.
His photographs are very strong, nonetheless, very masculine. He had a stylised eye that cut extraneous subject matter out of his images the way a butcher slices fat away from a side of bacon. Yet, the beautiful, transparent delicateness of his photographs of glass beakers from the Schott Glassworks in Jena speak with a gentle, feminine voice and his photographs of enamel bowls or a child's Pelikan paintbox have a Japanese feel to them, in their iconic and minimalistic compositions.
It is sad to say that even most American enthusiasts of fine-arts photography have never heard of Albert Renger-Patzsch. This volume, nonetheless, contains the best of his work and makes a strong argument for including him in the pantheon of the twentieth century's greatest photographers.
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent photo-monograph 9 Jan. 2016
By orlov_09 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an outstanding photobook. A great survey covering his industrial landscapes, factories, architecture, still-lifes, nature scenes. The introductory essay places the work in the context of European modernism and describes Renger-Patzsch's philosophical approach to objective photography. It is nicely cloth-bound in light gray. The photo reproduction is stunning; every image is large and extremely crisp, almost gritty, with beautiful tonality. I'm not sure how this book was printed because I cannot detect any halftone dots whatsoever. I wish every photography book was constructed this well.

Renger-Patzsch is one of my favorite photographers and I've always meant to buy a copy of Die Welt ist Schoen, but with this book on my shelf I've been persuaded to save my money.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure , it's great . 10 Mar. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you love Ansel , then you should love Albert too . though most of Ansel's photogarphs shows the beauty of nature ,Albert showed his sensity in humaneness and manmade stuffs .
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback