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Alan Turing: Unlocking the Enigma (Kindle Single) by [Boyle, David]
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Alan Turing: Unlocking the Enigma (Kindle Single) Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 344 customer reviews

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Length: 112 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2291 KB
  • Print Length: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Endeavour Press (10 Feb. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00IDCH6YA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 344 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,807 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When I downloaded this book I feared it might be concerned with Turing's personal life at the expense of his mathematics, or vice versa. I was wrong: David Boyle gives an excellent balance.

Turing was an eccentric: at Bletchley Park he chained his mug to a radiator, held his trousers up with string and could be found knitting in a corner. He found social small-talk difficult. But his mathematical thinking was profound. His special interest was the creation of an intelligent machine.

He devised the tough Turing test for artificial intelligence: there would be a man, a woman, and an interrogator in a separate room trying to work out which was the woman - who would be trying to hinder the process. Now, said Turing, imagine the man was replaced with a machine. Could the interrogator tell whether they were talking to a machine or not after 5 minutes of questioning? Turing would have been satisfied if you couldn't tell which was the machine - his test was not concerned with whether the computer was actually 'thinking'.

As a mathematician Turing combined logic with intuition, and he believed that computers could also (eventually) be intuitive. Remember, this was before the digital age. When the opportunity arrived at Bletchley to create machines to assist in wartime code-breaking they were huge; and even the very latest version, the Colossus, had only 1500 valves.

Turing was particularly interested in 'the liars paradox': at its simplest you can express it just by saying 'I am lying'. The statement 'I am lying' must itself be a lie - unless I was actually telling the truth, in which case I would have been telling a lie.
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By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This kindle single gives an interesting short biography of Alan Turing, the brilliant scientist best known for wartime code breaking at Bletchley Park and his pioneering contribution to the very beginning of information technology. This tells the story of his life from a bookish and withdrawn boy, independent and obsessed with mathematics, to an academic career which led to his important wartime work and a post-war period at King’s College where he faced difficulties in both the scientific world and his emotional life.

Alan Turing was both respected by colleagues and also infuriated many he knew. Like many great intellectuals, he cared little about external things – tying his trousers with string and staying in cheap hotels, even when he could afford better. He was also homosexual in a time when it was illegal and his sexuality was the reason for most of his troubles in later life. This book hinges on the 2013 request in the House of Lords for Turin to receive a statutory pardon for crimes relating to his homosexuality and there is also a fascinating possible link to Guy Burgess which I would like to read more about. Although this is a short book, it is a good introduction to a truly fascinating and ground breaking man.
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Format: Kindle Edition
When Alan Turing received a royal pardon at the close of last year, I quickly realised how little I knew of the man. The book covers more than just his most famous ideas/work as a codebreaker. It goes far back into his past to try and explain how and why he ended up the way he did. It makes for quite sad reading knowing the tragedy of his death in the end, but it proved to be a fascinating account of Turing's many achievements.
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This short but comprehensive study of Alan Turing acts as a great primer for the forthcoming Benedict Cumberbatch film about the great man. In some ways Turing was as eccentric and brilliant as Sherlock Holmes and it'll be interesting to see how the actor plays him. Turing also wanted to live life on his own terms, though in the end it seems that he couldn't and his way out was suicide. I'm no expert on Turing but it seems that Boyle hasn't missed anything major out. Unlocking the Enigma is more than just a conventional biography though and the author grapples with Turing's life as well as his theories and accomplishments. I would have liked a bit more material on Turing's time at Bletchley Park, but this is a small criticism of an otherwise engaging book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Probably the best book to read if one has started an interest in the life and work of Turing. A very short read but clear and concise in respect of the most relevant points regarding him, his work and the environment at his time.
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Excellent all round biography of Turing which gets to grips with his achievements (which were many) and also his complicated personality. Boyle treats the reader with intelligence and he succeeds in making some of Turing's more complex ideas accessible. Time will have to tell how prophetic some of Turing's ideas will be in reference to AI, but what this book rightly testifies to is his contribution to mathematics, early computing and also the war effort. The book addresses Turing's death well too. The comments from Turing's mother that the author recalls are even quite touching, as well as insightful. It is perhaps beyond the power of any author to totally unlock the enigma of Alan Turing, but this biography is as good a starting place as any.
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