Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.68

Save £5.07 (52%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Al Capone Does My Shirts by [Choldenko, Gennifer]
Kindle App Ad

Al Capone Does My Shirts Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.68

Length: 241 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Age Level: 9 - 11

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

Fast-paced and memorable. (Publishers Weekly, starred review)

The story, told with humor and skill, will fascinate readers. . . . (School Library Journal, starred review)

Choldenko''s pacing is exquisite. . . . [A] great read. (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)



Choldenko's pacing is exquisite. . . . [A] great read. (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)

Review

'warm and tender...believable and realistic' Express 'this engaging tale develops its characters subtly and skilfully' Sunday Times 'Gennifer Choldenko is a bright light in ... teenage fiction, and Al Capone Does My Shirts is one of her best.' The Independent 'This book is a masterpiece ... Al Capone Does My Shirts is wonderfully told and deserves praise galore' Guardian

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1142 KB
  • Print Length: 241 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens; 1 edition (19 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DB3EWD4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #94,492 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
On January 4, 1935, Matthew "Moose" Flanagan and family leave the comforts of Santa Monica for life on Alactraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. Moose's 15-year-old sister Nat has severe autism (the term autism was not coined until 1943) and her behavior fits the classic profile of Kanner's, or classic/infantile autism. She is preoccupied with her button collection; she counts objects and creatures in her environment and has memorized page numbers in book indices and tables of contents. Devoted to routine, she has meltdowns when unexpected changes are introduced. Her speech is primarily echolalic. She also has a flair for numbers.

Their father accepted a job as an electrician and sometime guard at the infamous prison and their mother keeps insisting Nat is 10 so as to stave off the encroachment of time. The rationale for this is to ensure the girl a place in a special school that has recently opened in San Francisco.

Moose, despite his challenges on the home front appears to have adjusted well. He takes the daily ferry with the other children who live on the island to the public school in the city. An avid baseball enthusiast, Moose falls in with a group of boys who love the sport as much as he does.

Moose's second biggest problem after minding his older sister is the warden's daughter, Piper. A sneaky snitch, she has a bizarre attraction to notoriety and will do just about anything to meet Al Capone, notorious gangster and probably the most infamous prisoner in Alcatraz. She hatches a scheme to have the prisoners launder her classmates' clothing; the catch here is that she sells this service as "having your clothes washed by Al Capone and Machine Gun Kelly.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
On January 4, 1935, Matthew "Moose" Flanagan and family leave the comforts of Santa Monica for life on Alactraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. Moose's 15-year-old sister Nat has severe autism (the term autism was not coined until 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner) and her behavior fits the classic profile of Kanner's, or classic/infantile autism. She is preoccupied with her button collection; she counts objects and creatures in her environment and has memorized page numbers in book indices and tables of contents. Devoted to routine, she has meltdowns when unexpected changes are introduced. Her speech is primarily echolalic. She also has a flair for numbers.

Their father accepted a job as an electrician and sometime guard at the infamous prison and their mother keeps insisting Nat is 10 so as to stave off the encroachment of time. The rationale for this is to ensure the girl a place in a special school that has recently opened in San Francisco.

Moose, despite his challenges on the home front appears to have adjusted well. He takes the daily ferry with the other children who live on the island to the public school in the city. An avid baseball enthusiast, Moose falls in with a group of boys who love the sport as much as he does.

Moose's second biggest problem after minding his older sister is the warden's daughter, Piper. A sneaky snitch, she has a bizarre attraction to notoriety and will do just about anything to meet Al Capone, notorious gangster and probably the most infamous prisoner in Alcatraz. She hatches a scheme to have the prisoners launder her classmates' clothing; the catch here is that she sells this service as "having your clothes washed by Al Capone and Machine Gun Kelly.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I chose this rating because it really showed how life was to have an autistic sister and all that their parents or siblings do to keep them happy. It has a great and surprising ending that really made me want to read the next to books. I truly recommend this book to anybody above 10 because it has some complicated feelings in the book. I am currently waiting for the next two books to arrive I can not wait (Al Capone Shines my Shoes, Al Capone Does my Homework).
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I'm a big fan of tween coming-of-age books, and there are lots of good ones. But, you know, many of them are classics built on nostalgia for a rural past. That's fine, but a little bit of "how I spent my summer down on the farm" with Grama, my cousin, my uncle, or my foster family, goes a long way with modern kids.

This novel gives us a strong protagonist, with strong parents, a challenging sibling situation, and a novel setting. All of that is fine by me. The writing style is effective and straightforward, but doesn't overreach. The book earns its emotional punch over time; it doesn't try to bully you emotionally or stylistically, which I think is fine for the target readership.

So, definitely worth a try.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
It's a while since I read this, but it has stayed with me as being once of the most beautiful and best-written children's books I've ever read. Same for the sequel, Al Capone Shines My Shoes. I'm midway through the third in the series at the moment (Al Capone Does My Homework) and so far it's just as good. They feel like books that are not just 'of the moment' but might actually stand the test of time. They feel like classics.

I love this book because the world of a child living on Alcatraz as the son of a prison guard feels so real. As I read I kept thinking to myself that it seemed like the author must have had first hand experience of it, or lived during that time, which obviously isn't the case - she's just done her research. I also loved this book because the main character, Moose Flanagan, is so likeable and sweet and such an upstanding young man, but one who always seems to get landed with the short straw. All the other characters feel very real to me as well, especially Piper, who I veer between loving and hating.

I'm always recommending this book to people and am surprised it's not more well-known.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover