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An Agent of Deceit (The Ben Webster Spy Series Book 2) by [Jones, Chris Morgan]
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An Agent of Deceit (The Ben Webster Spy Series Book 2) Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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Review

`The best debut spy adventure I've read in a long time. The two main characters -- a British investigator with a private intelligence agency and the key manipulator of a corrupt Russian oligarch's finances -- are vigorously portrayed, with satisfying twists and intrigues'
--The Times

Review

‘The best debut spy adventure I’ve read in a long time. The two main characters — a British investigator with a private intelligence agency and the key manipulator of a corrupt Russian oligarch’s finances — are vigorously portrayed, with satisfying twists and intrigues’ The Times

‘Chris Morgan Jones's debut arrives with a weight of expectations on its shoulders. But it's clear right from the chilling, detached opening that these are going to be met . . . Like the icy eastern winter that seeps through the pages of his novel, Morgan Jones's prose is clean and cold, crisp and ominous . . . this is a world Morgan Jones knows, and it shows. In its intelligence, its crispness, its refusal to recognise anything other than shades of grey, there are undoubtedly resonances of Le Carré here. But An Agent of Deceit is too good to need the publishing shorthand for "classy thriller": this is a debut that definitely stands on its own merits’ Observer

‘So-called "new Le Carrés" are 10 a penny, but Morgan Jones has a better claim to the title than most, having worked for 11 years at the world's largest business intelligence agency. On one level this intelligent, sophisticated spy thriller is about money laundering. But it's also about the willed innocence that makes such activities possible – the difference between not knowing and choosing not to know . . . dapper prose and stately pacing . . . Genuinely scary’ Guardian

'A well-paced, plausible thriller that brings a wealth of experience of corrupt modern business and flits between the City of London, the Cayman Islands, Moscow and Berlin faster than a liquidity crisis' The Times

‘Morgan Jones weaves an engaging narrative that, through Lock particularly, confronts the dilemma of the west’s engagement with dubious characters and companies – and not just those from the former Soviet Union. It is an issue with which many institutions have been grappling lately in places such as Libya . . . An Agent of Deceit is a worthy entry to the long line of spy yarns, and a reminder of how little we still know of wealth and power in Russia, for all the public visibility of the 21st-century oligarchs’ Financial Times

‘Brimful of insider knowledge, this debut novel heads into the world of corrupt Russian business dealings . . . an elegant, tense thriller’ Grazia

‘Elegant, deep and powerful. An Agent of Deceit is a thinking man’s thriller that reminded me of John Le Carre’s classic spy novels – but set in a chilling contemporary world in which spies have gone private and corporations are more powerful than governments. A remarkably assured debut’ Joe Finder, author of Buried Secrets and Paranoia

‘Accomplished and believable’ Sunday Times

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1708 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Mantle; Main Market Ed. edition (6 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004WDZZQA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #120,342 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
It would be so easy to say a welcome to the New John Le Carre. However, John le Carre is of course outdated in the world of 2011. He has a successor in Mr Jones and his depth of style goes on. I loved this book. You cannot skim through pages in this one, every word on every page counts towards this complex political thriller with Oligarchs, money that is so large to comprehend combined with strained family issues, forgotten deeds and the world Russian heartlands and its outer neighbours. The power of energy controlled by so few in this modern world screams from the pages as we feel sorry for both hero and protagonist and fear those who silently pull their strings.

This book, from brand new novelist Chris Morgan Jones, is fiery, passionate, complicated and very up-to-date. It has its roots and is I suspect entrehced from informatin gained over 11 years of the author's own past, (his employment in one of the world's largest intelligence units). It is a world of unsurety, of knowing who you can or cannot trust. One wrong move and you could leave the earth for ever.

Great wealth is for the taking, or is it?. Only the main players can ever win.Crime does pay at this level. This book is for those who enjoy very well wrtten, political thrillers. I have never enjoyed a book like this until I read my first Robert Ludlum in the 1960s.

Do give this one a go, it is not often that new authors are given the chance to suceed but this one will go all the way. AND.......we want more Mr C M Jones. Take heed...you have created a monster that needs feeding.
An Agent of Deceit
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By old dude VINE VOICE on 10 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The world of the Russian oligarchs is prime thriller material - mysterious, sinister and fabulously wealthy and the novelist can tap into the rich literary inheritance of the cold-war years. Chris Morgan Jones does justice to his material: his first novel is a convincingly written page-turner. If he doesn't quite match the resonance of the best Le Carre, who does ? He balances authentic-sounding financial shenanigans with life-threatening assaults in at least half-a-dozen countries and Ben Webster (his only-slightly-less-than-heroic hero) is a character who could run and run.
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By Charles Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
It is said that when creating a work of fiction you should 'write what you know'. Chris Morgan Jones has obviously taken that to heart with his debut novel 'An Agent of Deceit'. Hi bio on Amazon states that 'For eleven years...(he)...worked at the world's largest business intelligence agency'. One of the two lead characters in An Agent of Deceit, Ben Webster, works for Ikertu, a fictional 'business intelligence agency' and the whole plot of the book revolves around the activities of that organisation and the world in which it operates.

Its obviously a world that Morgan Jones knows extremely well and finds fascinating. The details of how Webster, Ikertu and the people and companies they investigate all operate feel extremely plausible. You can easily believe that the sort of complex and shadowy corporate structures that are central to the book's plot do exist in real life. You only have to think of recent scandals involving off-shore corporations such as those run by the disgraced financier Allen Stanford to know that such financial duplicity does occur in places such as the Cayman Islands. If you're even vaguely interested in that murky business world then you'll find parts of An Agent of Deceit fascinating.

What it isn't however, is terribly exciting. This a thriller that lacks thrills. There is a palpable sense of menace at times, but little that raises the pulse or keeps you turning pages. Even in the final fifty pages, when events finally begin moving at a more rapid pace, the book doesn't really grip you.
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By D. Elliott TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Jun. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The plot of `An Agent Of Deceit' is based on a clash between a Greek and a Russian billionaire and it involves corruption and intrigue in global commerce and east-west politics. From numerous factual media reports this scenario is entirely plausible, and from an author with the pedigree of Chris Morgan Jones' 11 years working "at the world's largest business intelligence agency" readers should expect a persuasive and potent account. However though all ingredients are available the author fails to be convincing as he relies on stereotyping of characters from the espionage thriller genre, and in moving between scenarios he does so without proper development. Characters and plot are just not made credible and it is difficult to empathise. Chris Morgan Jones exposes duplicity and deception of oligarchs with international fraud, money laundering, double dealing etc. and he interweaves guilt, revenge, obsession, betrayal, ruthlessness etc., and yet for me his narrative seems aimless and a lot is predictable. For all that he manages a denouement that is somewhat unexpected, but even so I found it disappointing and leaving much to be desired.
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