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Age Of Misrule: World's End, Darkest Hour, Always Forever (GOLLANCZ S.F.) Paperback – 14 Sep 2006

3.9 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 1360 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz (14 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575079185
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575079182
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 4.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 498,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

In Britain's darkest hour, a hero shall arise . . .

About the Author

Mark Chadbourn was raised in the mining communities of South Derbyshire. He studied Economic History at Leeds before becoming a national newspaper journalist. He is the author of several novels, including The Age of Misrule and The Dark Age trilogies.


Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
After reading many excellent fantasy books which are mostly set in , what I call fictional medieval times, it a refreshing change to read a book set in modern times AND in Britain.

The author uses the frailty of his characters to great effect and basis them on normal people with all the usual hangups.

The synopsis explains the plot but I just wanted to say that I thoroughly enjoyed this trilogy and I'm just about to buy the author's other works.

Pete
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Format: Paperback
Well' here's smething different,mythology,fantasy and the modern world all come together in a richly tangled web, but not too tangled to be spoiled.
Destiny,with the help of some iterfering gods, throws together some very different characters to fight for their lives and stop the total destruction of humanity.No americans to save the day though.
Arturian legend and english mythology come together to make england as fantastical as any imaginary fantasy world i have read about. I found the frailty of main chracters as their personalities clashed both frustrating and an added dimention to the story.
All added together, very refreshing angle on fantasy. I enjoyed it very much and anyone who enjoys fantasy should do too.
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Format: Paperback
I first read the Age of Misrule over ten years ago, but every few years I give a revisit. This is probably the best of Chabourn's sequence (accept for the Devil in Green)and serves to bring Celtic mythology into the modern world in rather a spectacular way. The result is a wonderfully eerie tale in which some of our worst childhood nightmares come to life and the familiar Elves good/Dark lords bad is turned on its head. This is not a new concept, it merely returns the Shee to their original position as being frightening creatures which our ancestors went out of their way to avoid attracting their attentions....

As for the monsters the Formori are a wonderful and fluid creation, and certainly beat the pants off the usual Zombie plague stuff which generally characterises apocalyptic horror. The other lesser monsters are very good as well and are just the kind of things you might expect to encounter on a lonely moor after dark...

The British countryside does rather suit the supernatural (all those old buildings and hedges) and it is well used here. Chadbourn's use of such locations as the Lake District, Skye and Cornwall are wonderfully evocative and really come to life on the Page.

The characters are a good attempt to bring real people into a genre often characterised by hobbits and boring warriors. In my opinion the best character is Ryan Veitch and his attempts to redeem himself to Ruth is what true heroic fiction should be made of.

My only complaints with it is some of the rather silly hippie ideas that periodically appear in course of the narrative - for instance Chadbourn clearly completely misunderstands the ideas behind science and the mysticism in favour of science lines do get rather annoying.
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Format: Paperback
Love it. Dragons on the M4. What more could you need? Well, how about some genuine flawed heroes, some of the maddest gods, and more hideous evil foes that you could shake a glowing sword at.

This is much more than a swords-and-sorcery epic - set in present day England, we are taken on a well written tour of some of the ancient "magical" sites of the land - with a decent story line to match.

Possibly Alan Garner for grown-ups (well, 45 year old teenagers then) with a touch of Stephen Donaldson and some well-researched Lore of Britain. But somehow it all hangs together. Even a few trips to the world of Faerie (and some other equally disturbing places).

If you have enjoyed Holdstock's "Mythago" series, or Mary Gentle's "Ash", or almost anything by Neal Stephenson - I suggest you give this a chance.

Highly recommended...
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Format: Paperback
In this gripping series, Chadbourn turns the world of fantasy on its head. He explores what would really happen if the Celtic gods returned, and, unlike other fantasy writers, indicates that neither the Golden Ones "the good guys" nor the Fomorii are particularly interested in helping mankind. Mankind must help itself.

His five main characters are each fully explored, and their flaws are exposed to the reader. They fight with each other, betray each other and all try to do their own thing.

This is essential fantasy reading for everyone sick and tired of 'noble' heroes saving the world.
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