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The Age of Doubt (Inspector Montalbano Mysteries) Paperback – 6 Jun 2013

4.5 out of 5 stars 125 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Main Market Ed. edition (6 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1447203321
  • ISBN-13: 978-1447203322
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 256,419 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review


"Camilleri as crafty and charming a writer as his protagonist is an investigator."--The Washington Post

"The books are full of sharp, precise characterizations and with subplots that make Montalbano endearingly human... Like the antipasti that Montalbano contentedly consumes, the stories are light and easily consumed, leaving one eager for the next course."--The New York Journal of Books


"This series is distinguished by Camilleri's remarkable feel for tragicomedy, expertly mixing light and dark in the course of producing novels that are both comforting and disturbing."--Booklist


"Hailing from the land of Umberto Eco and La Cosa Nostra, Montalbano can discuss a pointy-headed book like "Western Attitudes Towards Death "as unflinchingly as he can pore over crime-scene snuff photos. He throws together an extemporaneous lunch...as gracefully as he dodges advances from attractive women."--The Los Angeles Times


"Montalbano is a delightful creation, an honest man on Sicily's mean streets."--USA Today

Praise for Andrea Camilleri:


"There's a deliciously playful quality to the mysteries Andrea Camilleri writes about a lusty Sicilian police detective named Salvo Montalbano."--The New York Times Book Review


"The novels of Andrea Camilleri breathe out the sense of place, the sense of humor, and the sense of despair that fills the air of Sicily."--Donna Leon


"Camilleri can do a character's whole backstory in half a paragraph."--The New Yorker


."..the humor and humanity of Montalbano make him an equally winning lead character."--Publishers Weekly

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Praise for Andrea Camilleri:
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"There's a deliciously playful quality to the mysteries Andrea Camilleri writes about a lusty Sicilian police detective named Salvo Montalbano." -New York Times Book Review
"The books are full of sharp, precise characterizations and with subplots that make Montalbano endearingly human... Like the antipasti that Montalbano contentedly consumes, the stories are light and easily consumed, leaving one eager for the next course."--New York Journal of Books
"This series is distinguished by Camilleri's remarkable feel for tragicomedy, expertly mixing light and dark in the course of producing novels that are both comforting and disturbing." -Booklist

"The novels of Andrea Camilleri breathe out the sense of place, the sense of humor, and the sense of despair that fills the air of Sicily."--Donna Leon
"Hailing from the land of Umberto Eco and La Cosa Nostra, Montalbano can discuss a pointy-headed book like "Western Attitudes Towards Death "as unflinchingly as he can pore over crime-scene snuff photos. He throws together an extemporaneous lunch...as gracefully as he dodges advances from attractive women."--Los Angeles Times

"In Sicily, where people do things as they please, Inspector Montalbano is a bona fide folk hero." -The New York Times Book Review

"Camilleri as crafty and charming a writer as his protagonist is an investigator." -The Washington Post

"Montalbano is a delightful creation, an honest man on Sicily's mean streets." -USA Today

"Camilleri can do a character's whole backstory in half a paragraph." -The New Yorker
..".the humor and humanity of Montalbano make him an equally winning lead character." -Publishers Weekly



Praise for Andrea Camilleri:
"There's a deliciously playful quality to the mysteries Andrea Camilleri writes about a lusty Sicilian police detective named Salvo Montalbano." -New York Times Book Review "The books are full of sharp, precise characterizations and with subplots that make Montalbano endearingly human... Like the antipasti that Montalbano contentedly consumes, the stories are light and easily consumed, leaving one eager for the next course."--New York Journal of Books "This series is distinguished by Camilleri's remarkable feel for tragicomedy, expertly mixing light and dark in the course of producing novels that are both comforting and disturbing." -Booklist "The novels of Andrea Camilleri breathe out the sense of place, the sense of humor, and the sense of despair that fills the air of Sicily."--Donna Leon "Hailing from the land of Umberto Eco and La Cosa Nostra, Montalbano can discuss a pointy-headed book like "Western Attitudes Towards Death "as unflinchingly as he can pore over crime-scene snuff photos. He throws together an extemporaneous lunch...as gracefully as he dodges advances from attractive women."--Los Angeles Times "In Sicily, where people do things as they please, Inspector Montalbano is a bona fide folk hero." -The New York Times Book Review "Camilleri as crafty and charming a writer as his protagonist is an investigator." -The Washington Post "Montalbano is a delightful creation, an honest man on Sicily's mean streets." -USA Today "Camilleri can do a character's whole backstory in half a paragraph." -The New Yorker ..".the humor and humanity of Montalbano make him an equally winning lead character." -Publishers Weekly

Praise for Andrea Camilleri:
There s a deliciously playful quality to the mysteries Andrea Camilleri writes about a lusty Sicilian police detective named Salvo Montalbano. New York Times Book Review The books are full of sharp, precise characterizations and with subplots that make Montalbano endearingly human Like the antipasti that Montalbano contentedly consumes, the stories are light and easily consumed, leaving one eager for the next course. New York Journal of Books This series is distinguished by Camilleri s remarkable feel for tragicomedy, expertly mixing light and dark in the course of producing novels that are both comforting and disturbing. Booklist The novels of Andrea Camilleri breathe out the sense of place, the sense of humor, and the sense of despair that fills the air of Sicily. Donna Leon Hailing from the land of Umberto Eco and La Cosa Nostra, Montalbano can discuss a pointy-headed book like "Western Attitudes Towards Death "as unflinchingly as he can pore over crime-scene snuff photos. He throws together an extemporaneous lunch as gracefully as he dodges advances from attractive women. Los Angeles Times In Sicily, where people do things as they please, Inspector Montalbano is a bona fide folk hero. The New York Times Book Review Camilleri as crafty and charming a writer as his protagonist is an investigator. The Washington Post Montalbano is a delightful creation, an honest man on Sicily s mean streets. USA Today Camilleri can do a character s whole backstory in half a paragraph. The New Yorker the humor and humanity of Montalbano make him an equally winning lead character. Publishers Weekly" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Inspector Montalbano returns with an intoxicating new mystery

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
"The Age of Doubt" finds the redoubtable Inspector Montalbano increasingly preoccupied with the aging process. Into his pondering of the cycle of life drops a murder case connected to two luxury yachts that have turned up in Vigata's small harbor. The subsequent investigation leads to the Inspector's meeting of a stunningly beautiful young harbor official. Salvo is poleaxed with love by the encounter and much of the rest of the story is taken up by his struggles to cope with the uncomfortable infatuation. His legendary focus on police business suffers; his relationship with long-time girlfriend Livia becomes seriously at risk; and he is pushed into a manic binge on seafood at the local trattoria.

"The Age..." has some of the usual great moments that come with the Montalbano series, including a slam bang ending, but for me, the love crisis that is the center of this episode was a bit too drawn out and led to some events that were out of character for the Inspector and for the series. Still, a midlife crisis arguably makes even the most rational and responsible people do improbable and irrational things, so maybe even the Inspector....

In sum, a good read, if not the best book in this very high standard series.
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By takingadayoff TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
Beware - the usually crusty Inspector Montalbano is downright unlikable this time around. He's worried about getting older, as usual. He's impatient with his colleagues, his underlings, and the suspects. As usual. And he treats his longtime, long distance girlfriend, Livia, with even more indifference than usual.

Despite all this, The Age of Doubt is a gem of a murder mystery. It gets to the murder and the mystery right away, and it's short and punchy, a real pulp-style page turner. It's hard to sympathize with Montalbano, but we are still interested in how he will solve the crime and if he will be able to prevent further mayhem.

As attractive as Montalbano apparently is to women, they are still quite a mystery to him. Both he and the buffoonish Catarella are stumped by the presence of women who are not what they seem. They are even stumped by a woman who is exactly what she appears to be - a Coast Guard officer. Of course there are no women in the Vigata police department.

The series is consistently good, and that's a rare thing. In addition to author Camilleri's talents, we have to give credit to translator Stephen Sartarelli. He knows when to translate and when to just explain. It's smooth and natural, never awkward or clunky.

Unlike Montalbano. (Next installment is The Dance of the Seagull coming in February 2013.)
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Camilleri is one of the great writers of Italian detective fiction, and is certainly my favourite by a long margin. And Montalbano is the best Italian detective since, well, since ever. So I wanted to praise this latest book, The Age of Doubt, but I have to admit - reluctantly - that it is way below standard.

Yes, the plot is as good as ever, and most of the characters are just as enjoyable too, but what has happened to Montalbano? I do not want to give too much away to those of you who have not read the book - and if you haven't read it, then I still urge you to do so - but Montalbano's love interest, his coup de foudre (is there an Italian expression of equivalent force?), has him acting far out of the character created so well in the earlier books. This is not a mid-life crisis; it is behaviour that would be unconvincing if Montalbano were the most gauche adolescent.

For lovers of the earlier books, there will be too many jarring issues. To take just two. Given Montalbano's affection for Mimì's wife Beba, how could he encourage Mimì into an affair with a suspect? It just doesn't ring true. And then there is a sub-plot in which Montalbano uses the death of his own invented child as an excuse for not doing his paper-work. Too much, too much.

As a final query, what is the sudden and strange obsession with "clichés" all about?

Camilleri has been served well in the past by his translator, Stephen Sartarelli, one of the best and someone who has added much to our enjoyment of the books. Even Sartarelli seems to give up. How exactly does anyone "inhale a whole glass of whisky in a single gulp"?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm surprised at some of the reviews which found this one of the less better in this wonderful series: for me it epitomises perfectly Camilleri's ability to weave together the farcical, the affectionate, the melancholy and even the tragic.

Montalbano finds himself under the spell of yet another beautiful young woman but what separates his infatuation (or is it love?) from more conventional older man/younger woman fantasies which appear so frequently in male-authored books is Salvo's (and Camilleri's?) knowing ability to look at himself with a clear-sighted gaze as he struggles with getting older (he's 58 in this book).

On the plot side, this offers a glimpse of serious issues while wrapping them up in a fast-paced mystery that has Mimi making full use of his er, expertise. Catarella is as wonderfully linguistically-challenged as ever, and developments in Montalbano's relationships are laugh out loud funny.

This series hasn't palled for me in the slightest: this may be light reading but it remains delightfully witty with a sly, back-handed intelligence.
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