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HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 9 April 2017
Although this book is titled, “Agatha Christie and the Eleven Missing Days,” the author is unable to really create a great deal of suspense, or mystery, about the actual events of Agatha Christie’s disappearance in 1926. Therefore, what follows is really a biography which omits her very early life, and the way that those eleven days came to haunt Christie, who hated any mention of what happened around a time which was deeply upsetting and traumatic for her.

When Agatha Christie disappeared in December 1926, she had just published her sixth novel, “The Murder of Roger Ackroyd,” but was not yet a household name. Although her writing career was turning her into a rising star (one of the reasons why her disappearance was suggested as a publicity stunt), this was not a happy time for her. She should have been relishing success, but her beloved mother had recently died and her husband, Colonel Archibald Christie, had confessed that he was in love with another woman – Nancy Neele.

Christie had witnessed her parents lifelong, happy and contented marriage, and had assumed she would experience the same. She was desperately in love with Archie, but the two struggled financially and, when Agatha began to earn more than he did, it caused problems between them. Her success overshadowed his attempts to find a successful career and he taunted her, unkindly, about gaining weight after the birth of their daughter, Rosalind. Although Agatha tried to keep her marriage together, when she realised it was over, she drove away from their house and vanished for eleven days – causing a huge manhunt and press speculation which caused her huge distress.

In all honesty, it is hard to see this as more than the desperate attempt of a deeply hurt woman, who certainly did not expect the situation to get as out of hand as it did. I will state here that Agatha Christie is my favourite author ever and I found myself bizarrely wounded on her behalf, as I read so much of this book. Her daughter seemed often to be callous and uncaring about her; blaming her unfairly for the divorce of her parents, making hurtful remarks, and, even though she later found happiness again with Max Mallowan, this marriage was also not without its share of troubles.

This book is a rather straightforward account, but it does keep the theme of the book centre stage as much as possible; with books and stories dissected to reveal possible mentions of the disappearance, of the influence of people close to Agatha Christie as characters. Christie was certainly not a perfect person, but nobody is; she suffered agonies of jealousy, she was controlling at times (although she learnt from her mistakes), but she was also often taken for granted by her family, felt nervous about being photographed or interviewed and was obviously deeply hurt by the failure of her first marriage. I am glad I read this book and feel sure that Christie would be proud if she knew how her work has stood the test of time.
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on 31 May 2016
A very detailed and enjoyable read. I was finally able to find out what happened to Agatha during the missing 11 days. It was what I expected, but it is still a really good read.

The author is clear, concise and has researched this subject well. Which must have really annoyed the daughter and grandson. As they went to great lengths to discredit this book and I believe other documentaries in Agatha’s disappearance. If they had only told the truth instead of all the smoke and mirrors then this book would never had seen the light of day.

Enjoy as I did, as it gives more of an insight into Agatha. Which left me with more feelings and compassion for her than her own autobiography did.
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on 20 September 2014
This was an amazingly good book. Jarred has been fortunate in obtaining so much new information from Nan Watts family so at last we know what really happened in December1926. I felt he was very truthful about the main characters and that Max and Archie are described in an entirely different way to other books I have read on the subject. Rosalind comes across as a spoilt little rich girl who never worked for her living but was entirely dependant on her wealthy mother. Jarred focuses throughout on the disappearance and how it affected the rest of Agathas life. Interesting to see how she used aspects of her life in her books. Sometimes a bit repetitive but very readable and detailed.
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on 16 February 2012
I have read almost everything by Agatha Christie and have always wondered what could have happened to make her disappear the way she did and also why. This very interesting book looks into this and explains what occurred at this sad time in her life and gives an insight into the kind of person that she was. Looking back at that period in time, it seems astonishing that she could have been missing for so long. This version is more informative of her private life than her own autobiography. The facts have been produced by family and close friends of A.C. and so is a very believable account of what happened at this time in her life. For any Agatha Christie fans this is a must read and even if you have read her own autobiography, it is still compelling reading.
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on 15 February 2013
I found this book a real page turner. Knowing the story well, I was interested to see what Jarad Cade could bring new to his book. I was amazed at the detail he added to the missing days of Agatha Christie. The unbiased way he handled the new knowledge he had received.
Having read the Autobiography and biograhies of Agatha Christie this book is much more informative.
A really good book,well researched and well written.
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on 25 March 2015
Very good, enjoyed the book found previous reviews very useful.

The use of family documents to the author added to the subject know l.p. edge.
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on 4 June 2017
Interesting, but complicated
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on 24 June 2016
Loved it
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on 11 June 2014
This book covered other aspects of Agatha Christie's life and wasn't solely about the eleven missing days. However it was still a fairly good read.
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on 17 April 2013
I absolutely loved this book. I have always been interested in Agatha Christie and I feel this book brings you closer to the type of person she was.
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