£15.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Africa: Another Side of t... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Africa: Another Side of the Coin: Northern Rhodesia's Final Years and Zambia's Nationhood Paperback – 28 Feb 2011

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.99
£8.31 £12.22
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£15.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: I.B.Tauris; illustrated edition edition (28 Feb. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860649459
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860649455
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 2.6 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 676,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Andrew Sardanis was born and educated in colonial Cyprus, worked as a journalist and moved to Northern Rhodesia in 1950. He participated in the independence movement of Zambia and played a major role in the first Administration of the country. After a business career that took him to almost all the sub-Saharan countries he now takes care of the Chaminuka Nature and Wildlife Reserve, near Lusaka, Zambia.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This personal account of African nationhood strikes a lot nerves and leaves the reader with a lot to think about on a number of levels. Put together it provides a real roller-coaster ride of emotions and insights. The book builds up beautifully in the first chapters, providing the reader with a love for Africa - full of warmth, humour and joy. The author's level-headed account of British rule and the radicalisation of white politics juxtapositioned with the black struggle for independence is fabulous. By portraying the feelings of both sides at the time and without demonising either side, it argues a strong case for tolerance, understanding and humanity on a rock bed of libertarian values. The subsequent chapters describing the gradual changes of Zambia's UNIP government are thrilling as one gradually gets caught in the middle between one's loyalty for Kaunda's original Humanism and the realisation that the regime was not what it was supposed to be.
At the end, when it has all gone so horribly wrong, the reader is left with an understanding for how it went wrong. Uniquely, it is that understanding which may provide the reader with a respect for Africa and a feeling that for Africa there can indeed be a prosperous future in waiting. The book is a personal story of ideology versus reality, but it is also powerful background reading for any person about to move to or work with Africa.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having spent many years in Africa, in Zimbabwe and Zambia, and having been through the transition from colonial rule to independence, Andrew Sardanis' book is an important record of those times. I knew Andrew Sardanis during his time in Government and know the very important part he played in developing Zambia's industrial base; I was managing the Dunlop company in Zambia at the time of independence and had important negotiations with Andrew Sardanis over the future of the company there.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Africa - Another Side of the Coin 1 Dec. 2003
By Christian Olsen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This personal account of African nationhood strikes a lot nerves and leaves the reader with a lot to think about on a number of levels. Put together it provides a real roller-coaster ride of emotions and insights. The book builds up beautifully in the first chapters, providing the reader with a love for Africa - full of warmth, humour and joy. The author's level-headed account of British rule and the radicalisation of white politics juxtapositioned with the black struggle for independence is fabulous. By portraying the feelings of both sides at the time and without demonising either side, it argues a strong case for tolerance, understanding and humanity on a rock bed of libertarian values. The subsequent chapters describing the gradual changes of Zambia's UNIP government are thrilling as one gradually gets caught in the middle between one's loyalty for Kaunda's original Humanism and the realisation that the regime was not what it was supposed to be.
At the end, when it has all gone so horribly wrong, the reader is left with an understanding for how it went wrong. Uniquely, it is that understanding which may provide the reader with a respect for Africa and a feeling that for Africa there can indeed be a prosperous future in waiting. The book is a personal story of ideology versus reality, but it is also powerful background reading for any person about to move to or work with Africa.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback