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About Time 7: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who (Series 1 to 2) by [Wood, Tat, Ail, Dorothy]
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About Time 7: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who (Series 1 to 2) Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Length: 464 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2575 KB
  • Print Length: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Mad Norwegian Press (6 Jan. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HQNKH7K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #499,050 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you enjoyed the previous books in this series then you won't be disappointed with this one. It covers the first two years of the revived 'Doctor Who' - that is, Christopher Eccleston's time in the TARDIS as well as David Tennant's first season. It's not an episode guide as such - it doesn't provide a full synopsis of the stories. What it does do is analyse the stories in minute (some might say obsessive) detail with notes on how they fit into continuity, new facts about the Doctor or his companions that are revealed for the first time and things to watch out for as you view the episode for the umpteenth time. Then there's a detailed analysis, which includes notes on British culture so that overseas viewers will understand the UK-centric references, identification of what that particular actor has been in before, and (my favourite part) the nitpicks - plot holes and other stuff that doesn't quite make sense when you think about it. This is followed by a critique - the author is clearly a big fan of the programme but he doesn't let this blind him to any faults that the episode might have had, so it's not unending praise. Finally there's the Facts section, with original transmission date, viewer numbers and the behind-the-scenes stuff.

Previous books in the series, which covered the era when 'Doctor Who' was a serial, devoted a separate chapter to each individual story. Now that the episodes are mainly one-off self-contained stories, each one gets its own chapter, though for the occasional two-parter some of the sections are combined.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is beyond fabulous! It's not only full of extremely interesting facts about the first two series of the rebooted WHO but also lots and lots of informative articles and essays on Doctor Who in general. I started reading it at 10am and was STILL reading it at 1am the following morning. I was obsessed! Bloody great!
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Format: Paperback
The About Time series is possibly the most comprehensive and insightful guide to Doctor Who ever written. No stone is left unturned to reveal what lies at the heart of each story, with its context, content and production looked at from every angle, always intelligently - and with attitude. Bland, the authors are not. It is also true that the books are infuriatingly opinionated and wear their biases towards or against certain aspects of Who firmly on their sleeves, utilising superior tones which can be wearing at times.

About Time 7 is no exception to this mix, although it is perhaps an improvement this time around, with slightly more care taken with the proof reading, and side articles that feel more directly relevant to the content than some of the long-winded academic indulgences on popular culture seen in previous editions.

The ‘classic’ series having been dealt with in books 1-6, this time the reader sets out with trepidation to see what the range will make of the ‘new’ revived series, with just the single Christopher Eccleston and first David Tennant seasons covered here. Contrary to comments in some magazine reviews, there isn’t in fact an undue negativity towards the remodelled series (although dismissive references to Matt Smith’s tenure and snide remarks about Steven Moffat suggest that irritation levels may rise in later volumes). Indeed, some traditionally looked down-on episodes which might have expected a good kicking are in fact treated surprisingly fairly, although - be warned - better-liked ones are occasionally assailed. Conversely, some stories, which are initially taken apart for their illogicality and ill-conceived plotting, can unexpectedly be given positive reviews in the final ‘critique’ sections, judged as good pieces of TV drama nonetheless.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I own all the previous books in this series, and have enjoyed each one. The writer has strong opinions which, although I don't always agree with them, do give one much food for thought. The mixture of analyses and essays give lots of insights into the making of the series and where the ideas came from. If you're interested in how TV is made in the UK in general and Doctor Who in particular you should get this book.
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