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Abortion, Motherhood and Mental Health: Medicalizing Reproduction in the US and Britain (Social Problems & Social Issues) Paperback – 31 Jan 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 293 pages
  • Publisher: Aldine Transaction; 2 edition (31 Jan. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 020230681X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0202306810
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.1 x 22.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,152,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review


"["Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health"] presents a strong argument and an interesting comparison of the foundations of and justification for legal abortion in the United States and the United Kingdom." -Alissa Perrucci, "Contemporary Sociology"


"["Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health"] presents a strong argument and an interesting comparison of the foundations of and justification for legal abortion in the United States and the United Kingdom." -Alissa Perrucci, "Contemporary Sociology"

"Students of medical sociology, sociology of mental illness, and comparative sociology will find Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health an enjoyable and worthwhile read. Lee's study of the social construction of mental illness and the detrimental effects of medicalizing the human experience will find a wide audience."

--Casey Schroeder and Brian Gran, Journal of Marriage and Family

"Is the stress of modern motherhood enough to provoke psychiatric illness? In Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health, Ellie Lee adds another significant dimension to our understanding of the medicalization of reproduction, arguing that the experience of mothering is increasingly viewed as risky to women's mental health. . . . The book will be of interest to sociologists of medicine as yet another finely detailed examination of the seemingly relentless march of medicalization in which ever-larger swaths of human experience become pathologized and thus subject to expert intervention. Lee's analysis cogently illustrates the power of the cultural sanctioning to shape our understandings of life events. In this sense, claims about PAS and postpartum depression alike represent essentialist arguments that construct female biology not only as destiny, but as the ultimate threat to mental well-being."

--Elizabeth M. Armstrong, American Journal of Sociology

"Ellie Lee's study on the medicalization of abortion and motherhood is an intriguing look at how the selective designation of reproductive events as causes of mental illness serves social and political agendas. It is also a call for critical thinking on the pervasiveness of conceiving bodily and psychological events as problematic and something from which to be cured, not something to be lived and learned from. Beyond her focus on reproduction, Lee's book is an essential read for those interested in how mental illness becomes located in common life events and the motives that fuel this process. While acknowledging women's experiences as real for them, she emphasizes the importance of thinking critically about the adoption of a singular (medical) framework for their interpretation. . . . Lee's conclusions are surprising, persuasive, and unsettling. . . . Her book presents a strong argument and an interesting comparison of the foundations of and justification for legal abortion in the United States and the United Kingdom."

--Alissa Perrucci, Contemporary Sociology

"Students of medical sociology, sociology of mental illness, and comparative sociology will find Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health an enjoyable and worthwhile read. Lee's study of the social construction of mental illness and the detrimental effects of medicalizing the human experience will find a wide audience."

--Casey Schroeder and Brian Gran, Journal of Marriage and Family

"Is the stress of modern motherhood enough to provoke psychiatric illness? In Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health, Ellie Lee adds another significant dimension to our understanding of the medicalization of reproduction, arguing that the experience of mothering is increasingly viewed as risky to women's mental health. . . . The book will be of interest to sociologists of medicine as yet another finely detailed examination of the seemingly relentless march of medicalization in which ever-larger swaths of human experience become pathologized and thus subject to expert intervention. Lee's analysis cogently illustrates the power of the cultural sanctioning to shape our understandings of life events. In this sense, claims about PAS and postpartum depression alike represent essentialist arguments that construct female biology not only as destiny, but as the ultimate threat to mental well-being."

--Elizabeth M. Armstrong, American Journal of Sociology

"Ellie Lee's study on the medicalization of abortion and motherhood is an intriguing look at how the selective designation of reproductive events as causes of mental illness serves social and political agendas. It is also a call for critical thinking on the pervasiveness of conceiving bodily and psychological events as problematic and something from which to be cured, not something to be lived and learned from. Beyond her focus on reproduction, Lee's book is an essential read for those interested in how mental illness becomes located in common life events and the motives that fuel this process. While acknowledging women's experiences as real for them, she emphasizes the importance of thinking critically about the adoption of a singular (medical) framework for their interpretation. . . . Lee's conclusions are surprising, persuasive, and unsettling. . . . Her book presents a strong argument and an interesting comparison of the foundations of and justification for legal abortion in the United States and the United Kingdom."

--Alissa Perrucci, Contemporary Sociology



-Students of medical sociology, sociology of mental illness, and comparative sociology will find Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health an enjoyable and worthwhile read. Lee's study of the social construction of mental illness and the detrimental effects of medicalizing the human experience will find a wide audience.-

--Casey Schroeder and Brian Gran, Journal of Marriage and Family

-Is the stress of modern motherhood enough to provoke psychiatric illness? In Abortion, Motherhood, and Mental Health, Ellie Lee adds another significant dimension to our understanding of the medicalization of reproduction, arguing that the experience of mothering is increasingly viewed as risky to women's mental health. . . . The book will be of interest to sociologists of medicine as yet another finely detailed examination of the seemingly relentless march of medicalization in which ever-larger swaths of human experience become pathologized and thus subject to expert intervention. Lee's analysis cogently illustrates the power of the cultural sanctioning to shape our understandings of life events. In this sense, claims about PAS and postpartum depression alike represent essentialist arguments that construct female biology not only as destiny, but as the ultimate threat to mental well-being.-

--Elizabeth M. Armstrong, American Journal of Sociology

-Ellie Lee's study on the medicalization of abortion and motherhood is an intriguing look at how the selective designation of reproductive events as causes of mental illness serves social and political agendas. It is also a call for critical thinking on the pervasiveness of conceiving bodily and psychological events as problematic and something from which to be cured, not something to be lived and learned from. Beyond her focus on reproduction, Lee's book is an essential read for those interested in how mental illness becomes located in common life events and the motives that fuel this process. While acknowledging women's experiences as real for them, she emphasizes the importance of thinking critically about the adoption of a singular (medical) framework for their interpretation. . . . Lee's conclusions are surprising, persuasive, and unsettling. . . . Her book presents a strong argument and an interesting comparison of the foundations of and justification for legal abortion in the United States and the United Kingdom.-

--Alissa Perrucci, Contemporary Sociology

Synopsis

Whatever reproductive choices women make whether they opt to end a pregnancy through abortion or continue to term and give birth they are considered to be at risk of suffering serious mental health problems. According to opponents of abortion in the USA, potential injury to women is a major reason why people should consider it a problem. On the other hand, becoming a mother can also be considered a big risk. This fine, well-balanced book is about how people represent the results of reproductive choices. It examines how and why pregnancy and its various outcomes have come to be discussed this way.


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31 March 2004
Format: Paperback
3 people found this helpful
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20 April 2004
Format: Hardcover
3 people found this helpful
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 reviews
David Nolan
5.0 out of 5 starsExcellent book
2 June 2004 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
One person found this helpful.

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