Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.03

Save £2.96 (37%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Abbot's Agreement (Hugh De Singleton's Chronicles Book 7) by [Starr, Mel]
Kindle App Ad

The Abbot's Agreement (Hugh De Singleton’s Chronicles Book 7) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews
Book 7 of 8 in Hugh De Singleton's Chronicles (8 Book Series)

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.03

Length: 258 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Summer Sale
Choose from over 450 books on sale from 99p. Shop now

Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product description

Review

'Hugh de Singleton is a delight... the well-crafted plot, the excellent period detail and the flashes of humour.' --Donna Fletcher Crow, author of The Monastery Murders

'Dances along, taking you with it all the way... exciting mystery, delightful historical detail - a tale well told. I loved it.' --Penelope Wilcox, author of The Hawk and the Dove series

About the Author

Mel Starr has spent many years teaching history, and has studied medieval surgery and medieval English. He lives in Michigan.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1526 KB
  • Print Length: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Lion Fiction; 1st new edition (30 July 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00M930OHA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #159,841 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am really enjoying reading my way through the series of Hughs De Singletons Investgations. With this story he manages to solve a case without the help of his wife! Although as usual he leads us on a wild goose chase with his deductions, but gets there in the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The first time I came across the work of author Mel Starr was with his first novel in this series, The Unquiet Bones: 1 (The Chronicles of Hugh De Singleton, Surgeon). I liked that book because I typically enjoy historical mystery novels set in the medieval period of English history. Later I saw that other books had been released in the series but just never felt compelled to read them. When an ARC for this latest title became available for me I decided to give Hugh de Singleton another try.

Mel Starr writes wonderfully with the time in history and the places this character visits described in marvelous detail. There is a long list of explanations for words commonly used during medieval times which proves very helpful. There is a drawing of the town and the monastery. The only component missing for me was a feeling that there was sufficient plot to keep the novel interesting for the 250 page length. I wish there had been some other element inserted into the novel to take attention away from the main (and only) problem facing Hugh so I would not have felt there was so much repetition of information. With only that one problem to be working on there was much rehashing of what might have gone on and the possibilities of what that might mean. Character involvement could have been given more attention. Hugh had been away from his pregnant wife for weeks just at the time when she was about to give birth and yet that reunion is covered with a few simple sentences which don't even include dialog between husband and wife. I felt short changed because the novel seemed to just end as soon as the question of finding the killer of the young novice was established.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Interesting to read other reviews, some strongly "like" and some strongly "dislike". In this story interwoven with the murder investigation we see the dilemma of a man who reads the Bible -- before the Reformation -- and is aware of the conflict between the teaching of the Church and his own understanding of certain Bible verses. And when he tries to encourage the dying Abbot by quoting these Bible verses Hugh finds he is charged as a heretic for trusting the Bible, and suddenly his wife and child are under threat also.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Hugh is on his way to Oxford to buy a Bible - an expensive luxury purchase in the middle ages. His wife is due to give birth around Christmas and his life is content. On the way though he finds a dead body, eaten by crows but clearly that of a monk from the local abbey. Hugh is commissioned by the Abbot to find the murderer, his reward will be a Bible. However in searching for a murderer Hugh uncovers blasphemy in the abbey, is accused himself and realises that his monk was more involved with the sins of the flesh that at first glance.

I have read a couple of Mel Starr's books and I find that there is the same problem, 200-odd pages of enjoyable whodunnit set in medieval times and a denouement that seems over in a couple of pages and is lightly sketched. That's rather frustrating as Starr obviously has researched the books well and is comfortable writing in period, the characters are round and the plots actually quite tight. In this case I loved the fact that Hugh was convinced he knew all the answers but then suddenly realised that he know nothing and had to formulate a completely different theory.

Very entertaining but just not quite there for me
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Not as enjoyable as the previous books in the series. An atmospheric medieval who dunnit only. Where was the "Surgeon and Bailiff" part of the story? I was bored half way through, expecting more than the fleeting references to Hugh's life in the Manor of Bampton.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have to admit, despite some of the (entirely legitimate) comments made by other reviewers, this was one of my personal favourites in the Hugh de Singleton series.
Provided expectations are not placed too high, its generally quite good- of course there is no high drama, political intrigue, and little in the way of real action or tension, but this is not something the series generally contains.
Those expecting such things (or a series to the level of another Cadfael) may be disappointed. The Chronicles of Hugh de Singleton are a more slow-paced with the occasional foray into Medieval Medicine and surgery which I for one appreciate as someone personally fascinated with the subject.

I personally enjoyed the descriptions of life in and the working of a medieval Benedictine monastery, some of the other descriptions of social life, the impact of the Black Death and the exploration of some of the religious beliefs and ideas of the period. The story did perhaps drag a little in places, and Hugh is certainly not the sharpest tool in the barn, but generally the story was compelling enough that I wanted to read on. There is something endearing about Dear Hugh, despite his occasional failings a sleuth, and even Arthur, his burly bodyguard.

My only major gripe in terms of the plot-line was a serious contradiction given about the evidence of the night the murder was committed. Without meaning to give too much away it was early on stated that there was no moon on that night- and later that there was a full moon and a cloudless sky allowing persons to see clearly. This is not presented as an error, or seemingly even remembered, and for mystery buffs, might be considered a heinous fax pas- and perhaps the solution was a little obvious.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews

click to open popover