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Abattoir Blues: The 22nd DCI Banks Mystery Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 606 customer reviews

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By Book Addict Shaun TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 31 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
ARC received in return for an honest review.

It has been a while since I last read a DCI Banks novel but as with all the best British crime series you can pick them up at anytime and jump right into the story. Peter Robinson doesn't waste time going over previous books, certain events are alluded to but not in an overly detailed way that detracts from the story.

The blurb doesn't give all that much away about the story and I won't say too much about it myself as this is a book you should definitely go into not knowing all that much about it. Because what you get is a mystery that will leave you guessing, questioning every character you meet and wondering just what the hell is going on. And to mention how the plot would progress would ruin that experience. Two local men go missing. A caravan belonging to one of them is burned to the ground. A bloodstain is found at an abandoned hangar. DCI Banks and his team are initially introduced to these events through a stolen tractor. Major crimes it is not but the investigation leads them to something much bigger and soon their investigation really kicks off.

The first half of the book isn't particularly fast paced, but what Peter does best is fantastic characterisation and brilliant storytelling so the over the top scenarios you may find in other crime series (usually from the US) aren't needed. His characters aren't perfect, and all have their flaws but ultimately Banks has a pretty solid team of detectives all of whom are likeable and very easy to root for. I particularly like Annie Cabbot. Alongside that of course is the continuation of their personal lives, Banks in particular and his latest love interest. There's also a very funny comment from DCI Banks regarding ITV3.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Two crimes seemingly unconnected evolve into a wider problem for Banks and his familiar colleagues. A stolen tractor, a pair of missing males of slightly dubious means and a burned out caravan form the basis for strands of investigation to come together and merge into something a who;e lot more wide scale.

Abattoir Blues is typical of the Peter Robinson pen. Plots are plausible, the individuals believable, though the regular tribulations within the personal lives of Banks and Annie Cabbot are not as prominent as previously. However this doesn't detract, and as expected the novel is easy reading and rapidly completed.
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By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is currently (January 2015) the latest in the DCI Alan Banks series and probably the most gruesome to date. The violence isn't overdone and the descriptions are factual but the facts are sufficiently repellent without any more detail. A pool of blood and bone fragments are found in a disused aircraft hangar, sufficient to indicate there may have been a murder committed there. But there is no sign of a body. A valuable tractor is stolen while its owner is on holiday and two young men seem to have disappeared. Are these disparate facts connected in some way or are they totally unconnected random events?

The plot twists and turns and I found I kept thinking various people were behind all the events and then deciding that they weren't connected at all. I didn't work out the correct solution at all until almost the end. This is a well plotted story with some interesting characters and it's good to see Alan and Annie Cabbot getting on better working together than they were doing.

If you like police procedural crime series then I can thoroughly recommend this one. I have read all twenty two of them without back to back without getting bored and that is the test of a good series in my opinion. I shall be looking forward to the publication of the twenty third later this year (2015)
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By Squirr-El HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on 9 Aug. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Abattoir Blues, Peter Robinson, Hodder & Stoughton, 2014, 369pp.

This volume in the Detective (Chief) Inspector Banks series begins with him on holiday in Cumbria (“Umbria! It was Umbria!”) so that the two incidents being reported and investigated at the start of the story are handled by the regulars of the team, who continue to share the spotlight even when Banks makes his return fairly early on, when one of the incidents is still only a mysterious bloodstain in a disused hangar. The other incident is a stolen tractor – a very expensive one, belonging to a ‘gentleman’ farmer, a youngish former city man who Banks dislikes on first sight, which is usually a good sign, but not in this case. Annie, who began investigating that particular crime, soon finds the trail leads to a missing farmer’s son, which leads on to more and more hidden depths as the story progresses. There is a murder hidden away in all this, but who and why are a long way down the road, as the police investigation of the two incidents slowly uncovers a widespread agricultural underworld of stolen equipment, rustled animals and illegal abattoirs. This is a police procedural story, not a thriller, but it is nevertheless thrilling and unputdownable – I just kept reading until gone one o’clock in the morning to finish it.

This is an ensemble cast, as everyone gets their part to play in the investigation, and their own time in the spotlight. Banks and Annie Cabot, with the senior roles, get equal time, if not slightly more to Annie and her own supporting cast, with Winsome Jackman getting her own little strand to work through, which will eventually blossom in the finale. The other regulars are also present, even “Dirty Dick” Burgess, who has been following the money at the London end of the investigation.
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