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A Time to Kill Audio Download – Abridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 574 customer reviews

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Audio Download, Abridged, 7 Oct 2005
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By A Customer on 17 Jun. 2004
Format: Paperback
I read this book on my brother's recomendation after finshing Grisham's other classic 'The Last Juror', and I was sure that nothing could top it. Man, was I wrong! Grisham's first novel is certainly his finest and he tells the story of a black man without a hope in front of an all-white jury seeking justice with the eloquent, flowing style of an accomplished writer, despite it being his first. Anyone who likes a good story that keeps you hooked to the end won't be disappointed - I couldn't put it down. A tremendous read!
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By FictionFan TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Tonight around 1 a.m., Grisham's new book Sycamore Row will appear on my Kindle as if by magic. In it, he revisits the people of Ford County who appeared in his first book, 'A Time to Kill', all of 24 years ago in 1989. I couldn't remember if I'd read it, and even if I had, the plot had faded completely from my mind, so a refresher seemed in order. As it turns out, I haven't read it before, though I've certainly seen the film.

The story begins with the horrific gang-rape and beating of a young black girl by two white men. The two men are quickly arrested and there is no doubt about their guilt. However, Carl Lee Hailey, the father of young Tonya, is not ready to let justice take its course and sets out to take his own revenge. When he is in turn arrested and charged with murder, he asks Jake Brigance to defend him. While there's a lot of sympathy for Carl Lee, especially amongst the black townsfolk, there is also a sizeable slice of opinion that vigilantism, whatever the provocation, is wrong; and then there's the minority of white racists who think Carl Lee should be lynched. Soon the town is plunged into fear as the Ku Klux Klan take the opportunity to resurrect the days of burning crosses and worse.

Grisham doesn't give any easy answers and doesn't paint anyone as a complete hero (and only the rapists and the KKK are seen as wholly villainous). There's a huge cast of characters and we get to know their flaws as much as their strengths; and it's an indication of Grisham's skill that we can still like so many of them even when we are bound to disagree with most of them at least some of the time, whatever our own views.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After watching the film version of "A Time to Kill" for about the thirteenth time on TV I decided I decided to turn to the book to see how Grisham tells the story. I was expecting a more or less one-to-one correspondence between the two, but was surprised to find a number of differences, most of which to redound to the advantage of the film. This is an entertaining read and I recommend it to Grisham fans, but I can just picture Grisham watching the film version and thinking to himself "why didn't I think of that?" on so many occasions. This is especially true toward the end where the film finishes with a dramatic climax brought about by the skill and dedication of the story's protagonist lawyer, whereas in the book we simply seem to stumble from coincidence to coincidence, with the main resolution brought about by a completely incidental character who is only introduced a few pages before the end of the book. In many film adaptations the writers, pressured for concision, omit relevant and illuminating parts of the book, often at the expense of depth. With "A Time to Kill" this is entirely reversed. Grisham has a tendency to include too much detail, not so much in his descriptions, but in the minutiae of the legal process, so much so that I often felt the plot losing its bite as the same scenes were repeated a few too many times (eg Jake visiting Lucien and getting drunk, or everyone getting drunk at Jake's office). By virtue of its brevity, the film condenses these revealing yet ultimately redundant scences and keeps a much tighter pace. I admit that I read this book with the bias of knowing the film very well, but since there is a 2 hour, more polished, more gripping, more refined and more witty film version of the very interesting premise of this book I find it hard to rate it very highly.
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By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Jun. 2003
Format: Paperback
A Time To Kill, John Grisham's first novel, is a remarkably compelling, bold, fearless, lofty achievement for a new writer. While the book was picked up and published in small numbers at first, it was not until The Firm placed Grisham squarely on the map that this earlier effort was republished and made available for the masses of his new fans. What impresses me most about A Time To Kill is the way in which Grisham grabs your attention and sucks you right into the story immediately every time you pick it up; my interest and fascination was retained throughout the whole 500+ pages. I'm generally not a fan of lawyer or police novels, but the criminal events forming the crux of this novel are visceral right from the start, as little 10-year old Tonya Hailey, a black girl, is brutally raped and assaulted by two cruel white men. Grisham doesn't wait around to throw his best stuff directly at the reader. The two men are arrested and put on trial, but Carl Lee Hailey, Tonya's father, gets hold of an M-16 and blows both guys away (along with a deputy's lower leg) in the very halls of the courthouse. Jake Brigance, our protagonist, is determined to get his new client acquitted, a very tough task when everyone knows how the man planned and carried out the murders in cold blood. Naturally, some folks think Carl Lee should be declared a hero for what he did, while others argue that vigilante justice cannot be permitted. Since a black man killed two white men for raping his black daughter, race quickly becomes the big tent under which a legal and social circus is performed in the small town of Clanton, Mississippi. The black churches organize to support Carl Lee, calling in the NAACP and urging blacks from all over that part of the state to come to the courthouse demanding Carl Lee's release.Read more ›
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