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on 28 April 2017
Having read all of Cadfael stories and enjoying them, I was unable to find this particular book until I spotted it on Kimble, and I found it filled the monk's previous life as a soldier well
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on 20 August 2017
An excellent Brother Cadfael which starts from before he became a monk. Ellis Peters explains the creation of Cadfael. Read brilliantly by Derek Jacobi.
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on 25 June 2017
A good introduction to the CadfaelCadgael novels.
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on 18 November 2016
ok
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on 3 January 2015
an interesting book to read
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on 11 June 2017
Very easy reading
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A wonderful collection of three short stories (about 50 pages each) illustrating how the former crusader Cadfael came to become a monk, and three of the early mysteries he solved.

This review was posted for the Ulverscroft Large Print edition, and please note that in one important respect the Amazon editorial review above is not applicable to this version of the book. This large print edition has the merit of being easy to read, but lacks Clifford Harper's beautiful illustrations as found in some other editions of this book.

Includes an interesting author's introduction by Ellis Peters (or to use her real name, Edith Pargeter), and it provides brief glimpses into her favorite monastic's rare name, worldly career and personality.

Brother Cadfael's personal philosophy includes wry but compassionate acceptance of human foibles with our capacity for deception and wickedness. His devoted admirers will revel in any literary work which fills in the gaps about the delightful literary figure who has been called the "cowled crusader".

If you are a fan of Brother Cadfael, and have read all 20 of his full-length mysteries, you will be pleased to find one last chance to admire him in action. If you have not yet been introduced to Ellis Peters' medieval sleuth, this short story collection is one possible introduction, although the first of the full-length novels about him, "A Morbid Taste for Bones" might be an even better one.
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on 11 October 2002
These are three short stories about Cadfael before the novels begin, that is before 1143 when civil war raged through England. In the novels Cadfael is over 60 and his past is referred to lightly. In the first of these stories, 'A light on the Road', Cadfael is in his forties and newly returned to England, his soldiering days waning. It is during this adventure that Cadfael meets the Prior of The Abbey of St Peter and St Paul in Shrewsbury and makes his decision to join the Benedictines. The other two stories follow the themes we have come to expect from this mediaeval super sleuth.
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on 17 September 2017
Really not worth the reading. If you are not a fan already reading these short stories is unlikely to make you one, if you ate a fan you will likely be disappointed.
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on 25 October 2015
Like many I first came across Cadfael in the excellent T.V. series with one of my favourite actors, Sir Derek Jacobi, in the role of the warrior turned detective, monk. I love the T. V. programmes and watch the repeats when I can but however good they are they cannot compete with the written word. Nor do they. Now I have access on my Kindle I have started to read the chronicles in successive order. The first tale is nearly finished and I am about to gratify my thirst for Brother Cadfael by reading the concluding chapters of this well told story trousers is contributing to my insomnia like few other authors can do. My one regret is that I never found Cadfael twenty years ago. However, as they say, better late than never and as I am retired my insomnia is not a problem when I have such wonderful stories to while away the wee small hours.
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