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52FF by [Nash, Marc]
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52FF Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 343 KB
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005IHMZR6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #921,161 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
52FF is a concoction of short (and sometimes not so sweet) "Flash Fiction" stories all under 1000 words each.

The majority of stories were thought-provoking vignettes with an underlying nefariousness portraying the horror of both fantastical and real life situations, which work on our human weaknesses (anxieties, fear and loathing) with a twist of satire and black humour thrown in.

In the Nursery, is a poignant example of this heady cocktail of emotions and descriptive prose, by which the author, Marc Nash, tells this heart-rending story through the eyes of a stuffed panda in the room of a child's psychologist. There's a wide variety of stories to read, from the violence suggested in a seemingly harmless game of bingo in The Caller to the Bingo Caller's House Calls "House", to Badges and the stark loneliness of Lost Sole, where Nash's very British, analytical voice bubbles to the surface. My favourite story has to be Bittersweet, another fine example of how the author cleverly plays around with words, metaphor and new ideas showing a strong love for language.

With 52 stories, you can deal a story-a-day, there's a gritty, down-to-earth quick appetiser to appeal to your varying taste-buds. A great "loo book" too, and I mean that in a good way! I felt, that in some cases, there were a couple of scenes as opposed to complete short stories with beginnings, middles and ends, however, these tended to be more experimental and came across more like poetry, or an alternative style of prose, which I rather liked as they enhanced their individual potency. This made for a good read as I never quite knew what to expect from one story to another, making 52FF very hard to put down.
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By Ignite TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a book of 52 Flash Fiction stories by Marc Nash, a man who is obviously fascinated by words. The number 52 invites you to read one a week and although I have read them more quickly than that, I have found that the concentrated nature of the very short stories and also the density of the words, has meant I couldn't really just read straight through as I would a novel. These stories are nuggets. They are very varied in genre; some funny, some sad, some thought provoking. Some are effectively poems. I enjoy words myself and can almost taste these as I roll them around my mouth.

If I have one problem with the stories it is the author's tendency to use fragments rather than sentences; phrases with no verb. I find it a useful literary device to increase tension at the height of a fast action piece. Its use all the way through though, was a great distraction. I mentally filled in verbs! Apart from this, the creative use of language here engaged my interest. If you love words, you'll enjoy this one!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
52ff is a collection of fifty-five clever, inventive `flash fiction' short stories: one for every week of the year. Some offer a snapshot of a defining moment in a character's life. Some are experimental. Some use word play or prose poetry. Many explore an instance of transformation. Others show someone, or even some inanimate object, trying understand or describe their place in the world.

Reading these stories is like having a conversation with an interesting stranger you have met by chance. Each story is under a thousand words, detaining you just long enough to entertain you or enlighten you or set you a puzzle, inviting you to look again at things you thought you were familiar with. Whether the author draws on the mundane (the London commute) or the mythological (Atlas, Adam) as source material, the language he uses is always erudite, but the learning is lightly-worn. At the end of the book, Marc Nash explains some of the inspiration for the stories, which in turn may inspire you to write some flash fiction based on particular memories or incidents in your life, if you are so inclined.

The length of the stories makes this the perfect collection to dip into on short journeys or for a quick read before bed. The author suggests reading one story a week but I raced through them and enjoyed them all.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I have not yet met Marc Nash author of 52FF, but I will have no trouble spotting him when I do as he will be the one with the 1,000 word stare of the flash fictionalist. He will, it being the nature of the beast, either be coming down from nailing his latest ff or prepping to write his next.

Flash fiction seems the perfect genre, if that be what it is, for our times. You have an idea. You nail it. Forget beginning-middle-end, as to plan wld not be flash. We txt n tweet our lives into the real time river of whatever. Your flash fictionalist just grabs the raw juice and adds another 990 words to make it into a chunk of art. Is it a big poem? Nope. Is is a tiny novel? Nope. It's a stretched heartbeat of nowness, about a hundred tweets say. Those of us who can't live by txts n tweets alone, who crave more, but are super impatient and either unwill or incapable of reading a 100,000 novel should find the 1,000 word flash a perfect solution. You can flash read. You can take 1,000 words in a few minutes. You don't have to give up half your day. You don't have to work your way into it. Read. Change tubes. Read another. Move on.

To hold the flash reader's attention the flash fictionalist needs must to be nimble.

Marc Nash's creative intellect is exactly that ~ nimble.

I have so far read 17 of the stories in 52FF and can you assure you of this. Marc Nash is a writer who commands great originality in his choice of subject matter, great wit, great sensitivity and, this above all, great dexterity in his skill with da werds. He loves the the sheer pleasure of being in the creative spectrum in the wordfall. But this embellishment never gets in the way of the story, the mood, or whatever each fiction is about, but adds another reason for enjoying the read.
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