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300 Spartans [Blu-ray] [US Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 72 customer reviews

*Note to customers
Region A encoding. This Blu-ray will not play on most Blu-ray players sold in the UK [Region B]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region Blu-ray player. Learn more about Blu-ray regions

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (72 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00CLFS7H0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 315,652 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

From Amazon.co.uk

The futile yet inspiring stand of 300 Greek soldiers against the hugest army ever assembled in the ancient world inspired this typical example of Hollywood epic movie-making. King Leonidas of Sparta (Richard Egan, Demetrius and the Gladiators), prevented by political squabbling from sending his entire army to defend the narrow pass of Thermopylae, sets out with his personal bodyguard to fight off the ambitious Persian king, Xerxes. Along the way are a pair of young lovers, scantily clad dancing girls, and treachery though a secret mountain path. The 300 Spartans, made in 1961, has an overstated cold war subtext--there's much talk of freedom vs. slavery--and there are a few too many shots of armoured men marching through the Greek countryside, but the historical conflict has a fundamentally stirring quality. Also featuring Sir Ralph Richardson (Dr. Zhivago, Dragonslayer) as a wily Athenian politician. --Bret Fetzer --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Great classic film the 300 spartans who stood theyer ground over theyer enemy the film is in colour starring richard egan and Sir Ralph richardson this film gives you the effect of how it would have been like as one of the spartans. The spartans stand for the last time to protect theyer country but are betrayed by a farmers son who showed the enemy a old goat path over the mountains that the spartans had no nowledge off so the spartans loose theyer vantage point and are surrounded completely and slaughtered till no man stands. Great story line great scenery a real joy to watch a classic to any collection highly recommend.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
A somewhat hammy but overall really good film. I still prefer this to the OTT 300. I believe because of the original film stock there's not much can be added by blu-ray but I didn't get this for flashy bangs and special effects.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
very good
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
There are currently four options for this film: the 2014 Blu-ray for Regions A and B; a 2004 Region 1 NTSC release; and a 2007 Region 2 PAL release. The Blu-ray and the Region 1 NTSC release have a run time of 114 minutes. The Region 2 PAL release has a run time of 109 minutes (because PAL runs 4% faster than NTSC). All four are described as having an aspect ratio of 2.35:1 resembling the film’s original CinemaScope format.

I purchased the Region 2 PAL version from Amazon UK and I’ve compared its screen image on a 16x9 HDTV with the Blu-ray screen images reproduced at blu-ray dot com. There are differences: (1) the Blu-ray images are wider (i.e. showing more of the original CinemaScope image) and consequently with deeper letterbox mattes than the DVD; and (2) the Blu-ray images appear to have some greater colour saturation and a fair dose of digital noise reduction (since skin tones are blander than in the DVD).

The Blu-ray, according to Amazon, is available for Region A with English and Spanish soundtracks and for Region B with just English. These Blu-rays may not be interchangeable since Twentieth Century Fox is well known for releasing most of its titles region-coded.

The Region 2 PAL release has English, German, Italian and Spanish audio, and subtitles in 12 languages.

# 38
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a brilliant film from the 1950s, to have together with modern version, of "300". It is good to compare if you are a fan of this ancient cult story of Sparta, as they are both very good films, and very different looking in style in every way. I love them both. The older version this DVD tells a straight forward story, filling in the background of the Spartan culture and its very difficult and trying upbringing of children and young people in order to make them tough and unyielding. Richard Egan makes an attractive, tough, and strong personality of the leader. It is a neatly made film with every part and character slotted in well, building up until the fateful end against a horrible enemy.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I will begin my review of this film with the only notable flaw in it's production.
There is a scene where the Persian Immortal Army of King Xerxes is advancing into a hail of javelines and arrows and some are picked off before they could reach the Greek front line.
This scene is very well choreographed apart from one Persian soldier who get's hit. I won't dwell on this because the whole battle scene is very well staged and is virtually 100% true to the historicity of the Battle of Thermopylae.
The character inter-relations and the attention to detail is very realistic and is in accordance with Herodotus' Histories.
The film focuses very well on the cultures of both sides of the conflict (Persians and Greeks) and also touches on the religious practices of the Greeks, particularly in their sacrificial beliefs.
To summarise, Richard Egan and the rest of the cast demonstrated that acting could be as impressive then as it is in the present day. Good costumes, good acting, good scenery (possibly filmed in the region of Thermopylae, but I am unsure) and a complement to any History enthusiast of this era.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
only ok
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Format: DVD
The narrow pass of Thermopalyae is long gone, with centuries of sendiment building a large plain. The location of the statue of King Leonidas of Sparta set up along the highway does provide a sense of how narrow the geography was in 480 B.C. when a small force of Spartans and other Greek warriors held up the advance of King Xerxes and his Persian army (the parallels to the Alamo are palatable). When I visited Greece last week I was glad we were able to stop at the monument for a few minutes, not so much because of what I had read in the history books about the Battle of Thermopalyae but because of the 1962 film "The 300 Spartans."
Granted the acting in this film from director Rudolph Maté is wooden, on a par with the Trojan Horse and the ships that turned out to the wooden walls of Athens that defeated Xerxes at Salamis. But there is still something substantial to the battle sequences, as when Xerxes sends his Immortals against the Spartans and when the Spartans make a final valiant charge to kill the Persian monarch. The basic political history of the times is covered in the film; Greece was debating whether or not to send soldiers that far north to stop the invaders and the Spartans decided not to send troops until a religious festival was over. Consequently, King Leonidas (Richard Eagan) left with his personal bodyguard of 300 soldiers. There is a trivial romantic subplot involving a young Spartan soldier and the girl he tried to leave behind, as well as an exiled Spartan King, Demaratus (Ivan Triesault) who tries to educate Xerxes (David Farrar) about the worth of these 300 soldiers. In the end, the Spartans are betrayed by a Greek traitor who tells the Persians of a pass through the mountains where they can attack from the rear.
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