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3:10 to Yuma 2007

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A small-time rancher agrees to hold a captured outlaw who's awaiting a train to go to court in Yuma. A battle of wills ensues as the outlaw tries to psych out the rancher.

Starring:
Christian Bale, Chad Brummett
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 57 minutes
Starring Christian Bale, Chad Brummett, Russell Crowe, Peter Fonda, Hugh Elliot, Chris Browning, Kevin Durand
Director James Mangold
Genres Western
Studio LIONSGATE
Rental release 28 January 2008
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 57 minutes
Starring Christian Bale, Chad Brummett, Russell Crowe, Peter Fonda, Hugh Elliot, Chris Browning, Kevin Durand
Director James Mangold
Genres Western
Studio LIONSGATE
Rental release 28 January 2008
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Putting Russell Crowe and Christian Bale together in this movie was a master-stroke. They take opposing roles as the film romps along and the conflict (and then friendship) which develops between them makes for some gripping, nasty and touching moments.
This isn't one of those slowly paced, meandering modern westerns where it takes forever and a day for nothing much to happen. This is a vigh-velocity romp with plenty of wham! and bam! In 3:10 To Yuma the characters develop through blood, sweat and tears (punctuated by gunfire and fist fights).

Bale is a failing farmer, a cripple, who feels he's letting down his family and in particular his oldest son. Crowe is a high-living outlaw, used to ruling the roost and robbing whoever he can. Their paths cross when Crowe is captured and Bale agrees to join the guards who will take the prisoner to catch the prison train (that's the 3:10 to Yuma).

So that sets the scene for a road journey, one where the two men get to know each other, understand more about each other, fight each other, ride horses, sit round campfire, get beaten up -- all that good western stuff. The pace of the film is rapid, so it doesn't sit around dwelling on each point, but clips along to the next fight, the next showdown, the next twist.
There are moments of sweeping action on the plains and in the railroad yards, backed with gritted-teeth drama as the farmer's son starts to admire the outlaw -- his father can't compete with the glamorous gun-slinger who effortlessly charms the women, and provides exactly the wrong role model for the boy.
Bale's character can't quite believe that Crowe really is 100% bad, and that he's completely beyond redemption. Crowe keeps proving, brutally, that he really IS a bad man.
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Format: Blu-ray
'3:10 to Yuma' is the adaption from Elmore Leonard's novel and is also a remake of the 1957 film of the same name. The film begins when rancher Dan Evans (Christian Bale) heads into Bisbee to clear up issues concerning the sake of his land when he witnesses a stagecoach robbery, lead by famous outlaw Ben Wade (Russell Crowe). Then, with the help of Evans, Wade is captured by the law in Bisbee and Evans is one of the escorts who will take Wade to the 3:10 to Yuma train in Contention for the reward of $200. Evans' quest for taking Wade to the station is not only for saving for his land but an inner battle that he can be more than just a naive rancher in the eyes of his gunslinging son William Evans. The transport to Contention is hazardous and filled with ambushes from Indians, pursuits by Wade's vengeful gang and Wade's own conniving.

I've not watched a great deal of Westerns, so I didn't really know what to expect from this film, but I watched it anyway as it was directed by James Mangold who also directed some of my recent favourites, Cop Land, Walk the Line and Identity and I was not disappointed by '3:10 to Yuma' at all. The action and excitement is heavy from the get-go and the acting is just top-notch. The standout actor here has to be Russell Crowe who plays the cocky, confident and ruthless outlaw Ben Wade absolutely perfectly. I've never been much of a fan of Crowe but after watching this I wondered what I'd been missing as I thought he did a superb performance. Christian Bale plays Dan Evans very well, although I felt the character itself was rather a let-down as opposed to Bale's acting, as this definitely wasn't his best role I've seen him in.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
....They were paying me so they could walk away.

3:10 To Yuma is directed by James Mangold and co-adapted to screenplay by Halsted Welles, Michael Brandt and Derek Haas. A remake of Delmer Daves' 1957 film of the same name, it's based on a story written by Elmore Leonard. It stars Russell Crowe, Christian Bale, Peter Fonda, Ben Foster and Logan Lerman. Music is by Marco Beltrami and cinematography by Phedon Papamichael.

After the capture of notorious outlaw Ben Wade (Crowe), a posse is put together to escort him to the town of Contention from where he will be put on the 3:10 train to Yuma prison. Joining this posse is broke rancher Dan Evans (Bale), disabled in the Civil War, Dan is struggling to keep hold of his land and to support his family. Seen as a flop in the eyes of his eldest son William (Lerman), Dan sees this opportunity as a way out of his problems. But with Wade an intelligent foe, and the outlaw boss' gang on their trail, Evans and the posse will do well to make it to Contention alive....

Daves' original film is a fine effort, very much pulsing with psychological beats and cloaked in claustrophobic atmospherics. Backed up by two excellent Western performers in Glenn Ford and Van Heflin, there is many a Western fan who cherish it and never felt it was a genre piece ripe for a remake; myself included. But the logic behind the reasons Mangold and his team put forward for remaking it made sense. A story of great thematics for the adults, and action a go-go for the younger modern film fan. Thus putting a Western back in the headlines at yet another time when the genre was gasping for air. All that was left to do was get two of the modern era's biggest stars to play Wade and Evans-which of course they duly did-and it was good to go.
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