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21st Century Atlas of the Moon Spiral-bound – 30 Dec 2012

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Spiral-bound: 110 pages
  • Publisher: West Virginia University Press; Spi edition (30 Dec. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1938228804
  • ISBN-13: 978-1938228803
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 1.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 89,261 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Back Cover

On most nights and days, the Moon is visible somewhere in the sky. For many, simply noticing it is a pleasure, yet it is also a fascinating world of craters, mountains, and volcanoes worthy of a closer look.The "21st Century Atlas of the Moon "is uniquely designed for the backyard, amateur astronomer. As an indispensable guide to telescopic moon observation, it can be used at the telescope or as a desk reference. It is both accessible to the novice and valuable to the expert.With over two hundred Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images, the highest quality images of the moon ever taken, this atlas illustrates the Moon in high resolution. The "Atlas "clearly provides unprecedented detail on more than one thousand named Moon features, while recommending additional features and images to observe. With special maps of the limb and far side, LRO altimetry-based images of major basins and their mare ridge, and maps of the Apollo and Soviet landing sites, this guide offers a level of detail never before seen in an atlas of the Moon."

About the Author

Charles A. Wood is a planetary scientist who has worked at the Smithsonian Institution, Johnson Space Center, and the Planeary Science Institute in Tucson, AZ. He has taught and led education and research groups at the University of North Dakota, Biosphere 2 in Arizona, Haile Sellassie I University in Ethiopia, and at Wheeling Jesuit University. He is currently the chair of the Lunar Task Group of the International Astronomical Union Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.Maurice J. S. Collins is a skilled amateur astonomer who enjoys exploring the moon through datasets now publically available from spacecraft, as well as observing and imaging the moon from his backyard. He won the 2011 Murray Geddes Prize, New Zealand s highest astronomy award"


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Excellent atlas. Nicely printed and handily ringbound. The photos are crisp and detailed, with good shadow to better highlight the moon's features and gives a very fair indication of what the actuality is when the eye is applied to the eyepiece of a good telescope. While the attendant nomenclature is concise so as not to litter the map with too many identifiers (the innumerable A, B's and so on, craters are not labelled) whereas the important reminders of what's-what are thoughtfully placed, often at a slant, to follow a form. A glance at the cover will give you the idea. One thing missing, though, for each map, is context. The cuts to the photos' edges are quite severe as there is no overlap at all to orientate oneself with the next map along, which could be several pages further on, or back. No Lat', Long' lines either. Nor handy page numbers at each of the photos' sides to indicate the next corresponding photo. In that regard this atlas is no substitute for, say, the Times Atlas of the Moon.
The page of errata is initially worrying until one realises most of it are typos', misspellings or a small photo wrongly orientated. Still, overall. the absence of clutter does give a clear and pleasingly aesthetic picture of the moon's surface.
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pretty poor. the reason is that the book is littered with mistakes. so rather than correct them they just give you a list at the back of mistakes. written by professionals but not very good ones it seems
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This is an extremely useful photographic guide for anyone interested in detailed exploration of the Moon - from their back garden or yard, of course. It is disconcerting, though, to discover on p.110 a list of errata covering three-quarters of a page - wrongly titled images, incorrect spellings, wrongly labelled or positioned items, etc.This blatant carelessness detracts from what otherwise would be a five-star publication.
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The atlas is well finished, has great images, is spiral bound - so will fold flat 'at the eyepiece' and is printed on heavyweight glossy pages. All in, it feels like it will hold up to a lot of use.

So why not 5 stars?
I'd have liked the main charts to be a little larger- maybe it's my failing eyesight, but there's quite a lot off unused whitespace in the layout. Whilst this makes the atlas look classy, it detracts a little from the usability.

There's no overlap between the main images of the atlas- it doesn't cause any major issues, but it feels 'unusual' in an atlas of this sort.

There's no reference on the images to latitude/longitude and the coordinate system for locating features doesn't have any grid lines printed on the map.

There's a page of errata- none of them are major, but I'm being picky.

All said- a great atlas for anyone with more than a passing interest in the moon. Below, I've included some description of the contents which might be helpful to potential buyers.

The book starts with a short but informative and well illustrated summary of the different types of features to be seen on the moon and then proceeds to the main atlas section. The writing style will be familiar to readers of Wood's regular column in Sky and Telescope magazine.
The main atlas consists of 28 LRO images of the near side features. These main images are around 17x23cm and are generally clearly labelled. On just a few occasions the white label text is difficult to read against a bright lunar background but the images never look cluttered.

Supplementing each main image are a collection of more detailed images from various sources highlighting specific features with a short paragraph of explanatory text.
Read more ›
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