Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

More Options
20th Century Classics: Hans Werner Henze
 
Zoom
See larger image (with zoom)
 

20th Century Classics: Hans Werner Henze

19 Jan. 2009 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £9.75 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sàrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
21:30
30
2
10:58
30
3
12:42
30
4
5:12
30
5
9:28
Disc 2
30
1
5:28
30
2
6:31
30
3
1:45
30
4
7:33
30
5
7:25
30
6
17:07
30
7
7:47
30
8
2:10
30
9
2:46
30
10
5:32
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Mar. 2003
  • Release Date: 19 Jan. 2009
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Warner Classics
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:03:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001TMWOPC
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 58,231 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This EMI budget reissue in its 20th Century Classics series is one of the most important releases of 2009. It restores to wide availability two of Henze's symphonies, the great original recording of Symphony No. 7, which ranks with Shostakovich and Simpson as one of the finest, most powerful symphonies of the late 20th century, and Symphony No. 9, the little-heard choral symphony written as a tribute to those who resisted the Nazis.

SYMPHONY NO. 7
Henze's 7th Symphony is a fierce, tragic work, "...a German symphony, and it deals with matters German," according to the composer. The superb performance and recording was on May 25, 1992 at the acoustically magnificent Symphony Hall in Birmingham, with Simon Rattle leading the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

Rattle of course has since gone on to take over the Berlin Philharmonic from Claudio Abbado, and Henze's 7th was commissioned by the Berlin Philharmonic for its centenary in 1982. It is based more closely on classical models, using the sonata form, and Beethoven in particular, than any of his many previous works. (Henze, one of the late 20th century's greatest composers, is incredibly prolific, though little-known in the U.S.) It is a rich and powerful work, which contrasts tonal elements and classical form with "free tonality," as Henze puts it, producing an emphatically modern work which nonetheless resonates with the expectations of a listener with ears trained in the classical symphonic form.
Read more ›
3 Comments 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This set collects together several works previously available on single (expensive!) discs. The symphonies do have more recent recordings on Wergo, but these versions are still desirable. The Symphony 7 is an expansive (instrumentally) work that makes a big sound - the Birmingham Symphony sound fantastic here captured in the magnificent acoustic of the modern Symphony Hall - Britain's finest concert venue. The composer was also present throughout and this lends authority to the recording. The leitmotif of the human condition and opposing forces of good and evil apply across both symphonies. In the 7th, Henze refers to Holderlein's late poem "Half of Life" in a powerful way. Only a witness to the new barbarism - albeit as a young brutalised conscript - of the Twentieth Century could evoke the unstoppable, tidal effect of mass insanity in a country, in music. Henze - in his informative liner notes - says this is his "German Symphony". The shadow of Beethoven, as always, looms and Henze says he applies sonata form as an indispensable part of not only his symphonies but other works. There is structure in Henze's music though it is not immediately apparent but reveals itself little by little on repeated listenings. In effect, there is a lot to take in. Not least the literary reference to Holderlin - the composer held a special fascination for the persecuted marginalised human being and artist.

One can scarcely escape noting that the very opposite experience happily befell Henze.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is absolutely ghastly music and has no value whatsoever. As much as I enjoy 20th Century music, this composer's output can only be described as dire. Avoid at all cost.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category