• RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £0.56 (3%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
1965: The Year Modern Bri... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex Library Book with usual stamps and stickers. Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

1965: The Year Modern Britain was Born Hardcover – 24 Apr 2014

4.0 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£19.44
£9.03 £4.23
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£19.44 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • 1965: The Year Modern Britain was Born
  • +
  • The Golden Years - 1965
  • +
  • 1965 UK Yearbook: Interesting facts from 1965 including 30x newspaper front pages - Perfect 50th birthday or anniversary gift!
Total price: £34.57
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK (24 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857202782
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857202789
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 455,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Bray serves up a nostalgia-tinged appraisal of the year's key characters and events, never failing to show why these remain relevant' -- Observer

'In this entertaining and intelligently argued retrospective, the author draws together all the elements that laid the foundations for the second half of Britain's dynamic decade, in which we led the world in innovation, fashion and fun' -- Daily Mail

About the Author

After fifteen years on Fleet Street, Christopher Bray became a full-time writer in 2005. He's the author of Michael Caine: A Class Act and Sean Connery: The Measure of a Man. A film critic for the Mail on Sunday, he writes for the FT, Observer, Wall St Journal, New Republic and Literary Review. He lives in London.


Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 April 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In this book author, Christoper Bray, examines the year 1965 - what he calls a pivotal year, in a pivotal decade. There were some books brought out fifty years after 1963 (the year of the Profumo Affair, Beatlemania and the Great Train Robbery) and a few volumes (mostly in the States) to celebrate fifty years of the British Invasion, but this is the first I have seen championing the importance of 1965 and I was interested to read it.

The book begins with the death of Churchill and T.S. Eliot. It was the end of an era, specifically of two, great men, who looked to the past for inspiration. As Bray states, with their death, "right on cue, the future arrived." This book encompasses a lot of different aspects of the year - from feminism, cars, fashion, politics, television, books, music and class mobility. There is no doubt that it was a year which broke down class barriers and created a new aristocracy. With the Beatles, regional accents suddenly appeared - not only on the radio and television, but in vogue. After them, Michael Caine, David Bailey and others helped make other voices, other than the `upper class' tones of BBC English acceptable.

Naturally, music figures largely in this year. It was the year Bob Dylan became electric, the Stones needed some satisfaction and the Beatles released Rubber Soul. There is much about the Beatles - or, rather about John Lennon. For the author makes it plain that he feels Lennon was the main contributor to the Beatles and I have to say right now that if you are a Beatles fan (as I am) then you will probably not like this book. The author trots out various snide and unpleasant remarks about Paul - or `Macca', as he feels free to call him - and George and Ringo might as well have not existed.
Read more ›
4 Comments 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I used to think that a decade was the more appropriate time period for a detailed analysis – particularly when it was the subject matter of a book – but focussing like this does on just 1965 had some surprises in store. I have a great interest in the era as a whole so thought I would check it out. Actually I wanted to know why particularly 1965?
Firstly I wondered if just one year could feature so large that it could take the analysis of a book – and still remain a worthwhile read. Mind you, as the author has cleverly identified, 1965 really wasn’t like any other in the decade. Churchill’s death was of course pivotal – a massive moment in our cultural history (I remember it clearly and I was only 6), but this year was also monumental for music and the Arts, and many other important areas of social progress and change. It was only as the pages went by that these facts became clear.
Bray couldn’t have packed any more detail into this book. For that reason it’s really not a book I felt I could read at speed, particularly as I wanted to retain much from it. The insights into R.D. Laing were particularly interesting, as were the larger references to cultural giants of the day Bob Dylan, Lennon & McCartney, T.S. Eliot (who died a few streets from Churchill in the same month I discovered), and even Mary Whitehouse. Censorship issues are covered in much detail here.
It’s clear that a lot of time and thought has been put into this book. This is why it is a definite 5 star. It’s the detail that particularly makes this book for me.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed reading this book. I have a BA in Humanities and so the wide range of cultural and artistic topics covered ranging from, poetry, art, music, films, politics, plays, literature and medical/scientific aspects were of great interest. Indeed, the book enticed me to spend a great deal of money buying up some of the films, music and books reviewed by Christopher Bray to actually experience them for myself. The fact that the book was written in an amusing style also helped to make it a fairly easy and enjoyable read.

I was six-years old in 1965 and lived in London at the time and it brought back some very nostalgic memories of the 60s as seen through my young eyes. I also read the book while commuting to my London job and listening to some 60s music on an I-Pod. Add to this the London atmosphere of black cabs, Underground Roundels and Red buses and I just wanted to return to those times to experience them as an adult.

Although the content of the book is fairy broad a keen interest in the arts would help the reader to get the most out of it.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In 1965 I finished being a student and got my first teaching job but the year did not seem to be so monumental as Christopher Bray makes out. Like most young people of the time it all went over my head. I did not find the book an "easy read" but it was good to reflect on that year and realise the subtle nuances of the year.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I was 8 in 1965 so i do remember the year at least from a child's eye view! remember 'Till Death U s Do Part' and The Avengers clearly, but strangely have no recollection of Churchills funeral! Loved the Chapter on The Beatles and Rubber Soul album. It was a good year but not as good as 1966, not a big fan of Bob Dylan. Yes i know the feeling, i got to 13 and realised i had just missed the decade of fun!! would liked to have been a teen in 1965. Still i do have good memories of the 60's despite being so young, it was a happy time. Good book and mostly quite readable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback