• RRP: £13.08
  • You Save: £0.75 (6%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
1491: New Revelations of ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 4 images

1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (Vintage) Paperback – 10 Oct 2006

4.3 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£10.91
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.33
£6.74 £3.19
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.33 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (Vintage)
  • +
  • 1493: How Europe's Discovery of the Americas Revolutionized Trade, Ecology and Life on Earth
  • +
  • 1492: The Year Our World Began
Total price: £36.00
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 541 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books USA (10 Oct. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400032059
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400032051
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 2.9 x 20.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 38,425 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"One of the most compelling books of her remarkable career. . . . A magisterial and subtle exploration of all-too-human emotions."-"The Seattle Times"
"Appealing. . . . Something to gladden hearts-at least among aficionados of the formally perfect murder scheme. . . . Even its murder victim is delectable. . . . The reader . . . secretly thrills to the discovery of each new corpse."
-"The New York Times"
"Thrilling. . . . Tantalizing. . . . Intense. . . . The solution to the crime is satisfyingly elegant."-"The Boston Herald"
"James is at the height of her writing powers in describing this craggy bit of rock off England's coast so thoroughly that you can feel the wind against your face and the scrubland brush against your boots. Like Dalgleish and Miskin, you will wish you could return." -"The Baltimore Sun"

"Engagingly written and utterly absorbing... part detective story, part epic and part tragedy."-"The Miami Herald"
" "
"Provocative... a Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high."-"San Francisco Chronicle"
" "
"Marvelous... a revelation... our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned."-"The New York Sun"
"Monumental....Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work."-"Salon"
"Concise and brilliantly entertaining... reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail."- "The Los Angeles Times"

" Engagingly written and utterly absorbing... part detective story, part epic and part tragedy." - "The Miami Herald"
" "
" Provocative... a Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high." - "San Francisco Chronicle"
" "
" Marvelous... a revelation... our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned." - "The New York Sun"
" Monumental....Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work." - "Salon"
" Concise and brilliantly entertaining... reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail." - "The Los Angeles Times"

"Engagingly written and utterly absorbing... part detective story, part epic and part tragedy."-"The Miami Herald"
" "
"Provocative... a Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high."-"San Francisco Chronicle"
" "
"Marvelous... a revelation... our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned."-"The New York Sun"
"Monumental....Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work."-"Salon "
"Concise and brilliantly entertaining... reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail."- "The Los Angeles Times"

“Engagingly written and utterly absorbing... part detective story, part epic and part tragedy.”–"The Miami Herald"
" "
“Provocative... a Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high.”–"San Francisco Chronicle"
" "
“Marvelous... a revelation... our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned.”–"The New York Sun"
“Monumental....Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work.”–"Salon "
“Concise and brilliantly entertaining... reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail.”– "The Los Angeles Times"

"A journalistic masterpiece."
"--The New York Review of Books"
"Marvelous. . . . A sweeping portrait of human life in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus. . . . A remarkably engaging writer."
"--The New York Times Book Review"
"Fascinating. . . . A landmark of a book that drops ingrained images of colonial American into the dustbin, one after the other."
"--The Boston Globe"
"A ripping, man-on-the-ground tour of a world most of us barely intuit. . . . An exhilarating shift in perspective. . . . "1491" erases our myth of a wilderness Eden. It replaces that fallacy with evidence of a different genesis, exciting and closer to true."
"--The Cleveland Plain Dealer"
"Mann tells a powerful, provocative and important story. . . . "1491" vividly compels us to re-examine how we teach the ancient history of the Americas and how we live with the environmental consequences of colonization."
"--The Washington Post Book World"
"Engagingly written and utterly absorbing. . . . Part detective story, part epic and part tragedy."
"--The Miami Herald
"
"Provocative. . . . A Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high."
"--San Francisco Chronicle
"
"Marvelous. . . . A revelation. . . . Our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned."
"--The New York Sun
"
"Monumental. . . . Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work."
"--Salon
"
"Concise and brilliantly entertaining. . . . Reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail."
"--Los Angeles Times
"

A journalistic masterpiece.
" The New York Review of Books"
Marvelous. . . . A sweeping portrait of human life in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus. . . . A remarkably engaging writer.
" The New York Times Book Review"
Fascinating. . . . A landmark of a book that drops ingrained images of colonial American into the dustbin, one after the other.
" The Boston Globe"
A ripping, man-on-the-ground tour of a world most of us barely intuit. . . . An exhilarating shift in perspective. . . . "1491" erases our myth of a wilderness Eden. It replaces that fallacy with evidence of a different genesis, exciting and closer to true.
" The Cleveland Plain Dealer"
Mann tells a powerful, provocative and important story. . . . "1491" vividly compels us to re-examine how we teach the ancient history of the Americas and how we live with the environmental consequences of colonization.
" The Washington Post Book World"
Engagingly written and utterly absorbing. . . . Part detective story, part epic and part tragedy.
" The Miami Herald
"
Provocative. . . .A Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development. Mann has chronicled an important shift in our vision of world development, one out young children could end up studying in their text books when they reach junior high.
" San Francisco Chronicle
"
Marvelous. . . .A revelation. . . . Our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must now be jettisoned.
" The New York Sun
"
Monumental. . . . Mann slips in so many fresh, new interpretations of American history that it all adds up to a deeply subversive work.
" Salon
"
Concise and brilliantly entertaining. . . . Reminiscent of John McPhee's eloquence with scientific detail.
" Los Angeles Times
""

About the Author

Charles C. Mann is a correspondent for "Science" and "The Atlantic Monthly, " and has co-written four previous books including "Noah s Choice: The Future of Endangered Species "and "The Second Creation." A three-time National Magazine Award finalist, he has won awards from the American Bar Association, the Margaret Sanger Foundation, the American Institute of Physics, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, among others. His writing was twice selected for both "The Best American Science Writing "and "The Best American Science and Nature Writing. "He lives with his wife and their children in Amherst, Massachusetts."


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There has been much scholarly discussion over the years about pre-Columbian societies in the Americas. How many were there? What technologies did they develop? Did they have writing? What destroyed them? Where is the evidence?

In this book, Charles Mann brought together much of the recent scholarly knowledge, piecing together evidence from across North, Central and South America, to come up with a cohesive image of what the Americas looked like in terms of human occupation before Columbus.

The book's main arguemnt is that the Americas were already heavily populated with as many as 20 million people when Columbus arrived. These people possessed technology very advanced that was not, as much of history tells, puny and weak compared to what Europeans had developed. Agricultural methods were advanced and very productive, providing the basis for the establishment of large sedentary populations, much larger than previously thought. These large populations were mainly destroyed by disease. What we see today are in fact the remaining population after the equivalent of a holocaust, which is hardly a good basis to judge their capabilities and one time glory.

To demonstrate this theory, evidence is gathered from archeology and ancient reports from travellers. From most 16th century explorers, we get a picture of a heavily populated landscape, both in the southeastern US and in the Amazon. However, explorers through the same regions roughtly a century later describe a landscape of peaceful nature without large human interventions. The archeological evidence, as more is discovered, points in the direction of large populations and many characteristics (such as religion and art) of sedentary populations.
Read more ›
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Many thousands of years ago, people arrived in the Western Hemisphere from Asia. How many years, how many people and how many times they made the incursion are all topics of this book. How they lived has been the subject of increasingly intense investigation. Mann has assembled much research, both old and modern, to present a sweeping analysis of what the Europeans found when they arrived millennia later from the opposite direction. In a compelling and well-structured account, he offers an iconoclastic analysis of what the Americas were before Columbus' arrival.
Mann's thesis is that the Western Hemisphere was far more densely populated than our school courses [when they touched on the indigenous peoples at all] led us to believe. After fitful starts along the Atlantic seaboard, European colonists felt they'd entered a nearly empty continent. The sweeping expansion of the United States seemed to reinforce the notion of an "empty land". Recent archaeological finds and closer examination of the conquistadores' accounts suggest otherwise. It's now known that many urban centres of high population density existed in the Mississippi Valley, in central Mexico and throughout South America. The peoples living there had complex societies and economies, with trading and cultural influences extending vast distances. Intricate calendar systems, including use of "zero" as a real number, existed centuries before Europeans developed the idea.
Why did these cities and their inhabitants not survive to greet the invaders? There are the accounts of Cortes in Tenochtitlan and Pizarro saw Inka settlements, but population conglomerates seem rare in most accounts. According to Mann, the culprit was European disease resulting from the development of agriculture.
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Mar. 2011
Format: Paperback
It's a great title, and a great book. Though some reviewers have fussed at the sub-title, claiming that there weren't really new revelations in the book, should I be ashamed to admit that almost all the book was history of the best kind; the history I did not know?

Of course the book is not literally about that year; it covers the period from the very first arrival of humans in America, which Mann claims is substantially before the 12,000 BC Bering Straits land bridge arrival that I had been taught; and it extends to much beyond the initial arrival of the Europeans, to cover their interactions with the natives. The author devotes major sections to the civilizations in what is now Peru, and Mexico; the prehistoric finds in eastern New Mexico; the Cahokia "mound builders" around modern-day St. Louis; the arrival of the Pilgrims in New England; and life in "Amazonia."

Charles Mann is not a "scholar"; instead he has a journalist background writing for "Science" and the "Atlantic Monthly," and I think the reader is much better served as a result. He displays humbling erudition, managing to incorporate observations by Nabokov and Pascal, while also capable of giving a concise explanation of the Carbon-14 dating process in one paragraph. His central premise is to debunk the idea that not many people were in America, in 1491, and that they were "primitives," devoid of higher learning. His first chapter is entitled "Holmberg's Mistake," after the academic who promoted the concept, and Mann quotes from historians George Bancroft, Samuel Eliot Morison and Hugh Trevor-Roper who supported this view.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback