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what's bin did and what's bin hid LP

Donovan Vinyl
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: MARBLE ARCH
  • ASIN: B003YXSXS6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Victor HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Vinyl
This is a great album of gentle, folky material. Clearly very influenced by Bob Dylan's early work Donovan treats us to a series of gentle guitar led songs that alternate between simple love songs and tracks with a more political edge that decry the state of the world. It contains the original recording of `Colours', a beautiful love song that has to be one of my favourite tracks of all time. Yet to descend into full psychedelic hippiehood, this is a set of elegant simple acoustic tracks that have a quiet and gentle beauty to them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Victor HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Looking to expand my Donovan collection past a couple of `best of' albums, I started with this 1964 debut album for Pye, reissued in 2001 on Castle.

Its a great album of gentle, folky material. Clearly very influenced by Bob Dylan's early work Donovan treats us to a series of gentle guitar led songs that alternate between simple love songs and tracks with a more political edge that decry the state of the world. It contains the original recording of `Colours', a beautiful love song that has to be one of my favourite tracks of all time. Yet to descend into full psychedelic hippiehood, this is a set of elegant simple acoustic tracks that have a quiet and gentle beauty to them.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad track on the whole LP 23 July 2013
Format:MP3 Download|Verified Purchase
So many current singer songwriters would have been encouraged (if not first hand) by Donovan's craftsmanship on this early album.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Variety 8 Aug 2005
By Greg Tallent - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is Donovan's first album. One of the most remarkable things about it is the sheer scope of the artist's talent. On his first album, Donovan manages to cover a variety of styles, from the poetic and beautifully romantic "Catch the Wind," to the jug-band style of "Keep on Truckin'" and the bluesy traditional folk song "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond." Donovan's writing is at its finest here. I enjoy the romantic songs the best. "Josie," "Catch the Wind" and "Ramblin' Boy" are all simple but delicately expressive folk songs. It's amazing what beauty can come out of three chords and one scale. The bonus tracks on the reissue are all fantastic. "Colours" is a classic Donovan song. The lyrics are relatively simple but somehow Donovan is able to inject powerful meaning into a few words and leave the listener pondering the meaning of "yellow" and "blue." Also included is the original version of "Catch the Wind" with a tasteful string arrangement in the background. A great introduction to the early folk side of a talented songwriter.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Donovan's First Big Album 27 Mar 2010
By Catherine Goltz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
From the first day a young Scottish born Woody Guthrie- Bob Dylan sound alike appeared on British TV people were drawn to the boy called Donovan. This is his debut album which includes not one but two versions of his debut single "Catch the Wind" (also the title of the re-release of the album and many of his 1965 compliation albums). Donovan claims he wrote it for Linda Lawrence his future wife and muse (and the then girlfriend of Brian Jones) but it was written long before he met her. The other songs:
Josie- Written for a girlfriend in '64 this should have been the second track although some issues DO have it that way.
Remember The Alamo- Written by a teacher in the 1950s, this is a somewhat inaccurate look at the Alamo (what else?)
Cuttin' Out- a reworking of "St. James Infirmary".
Car Car (Riding In My Car)- Donovan says "This is for Woody" meaning Woody Guthrie. Like Bob Dylan he copied Guthrie's looks, with a fisherman's cap and harmonica as well as a "This Machine Kills" guitar.
Keep On Truckin'- The classic Blind Boy Fuller number featuring Don's sidekick Gypsy Dave on kazoo. It is said that he produced a single for Gypsy Dave but it never was recorded due to Gyp's limited singing range.
Goldwatch Blues- written by Mick Softley one of Don's guitar mentors. Mick also composed "The War Drags On" for his Universal Soldier EP.
To Sing For You- The song Donvan sings to Bob Dylan in the hotel room scene in the Don't Look Back film.
You're Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond- An old 1930s blues number.
Tangerine Puppet- Donovan's only official recorded instrumental with one spoken line "This is the fairy story of Tangerine Puppet".
Donna Donna- A popular Yiddish folk song that Donovan learned from Joan Baez's first album.
Rambling Boy- Not to be confused with the Tom Paxton number of the same name this is an original about the kind of person Donovan was as a teenager.
Bonus tracks include:
Catch the Wind (with string orchestra)
Why Do You Treat Me Like You Do? (B-side to CTW)
Every Man Has His Chain- From a French EP the song begins with Donovan talking to former Shadows bassist Brian Locking who also plays on "Catch the Wind"
Colours- Harmonica version of a song that would appear on his next LP...
4.0 out of 5 stars A Pleasant Folk Effort, Not Himself Yet 19 Jun 2012
By Sara Holliday - Published on Amazon.com
No need to stage Donovan vs. Dylan: why not love both? This first album from the then-19-year-old's folk period is indeed very parallel to Bob Dylan's self-titled album of 1962--guitar style, nod to Woody Guthrie--but sweeter and less serious, satirical, and humorous. (Except for "Remember the Alamo," which is kind of unintentionally funny.) A word of defense: "Ramblin' Boy" is going to make you think Donovan is stealing from Dylan's "It Ain't Me, Babe"--in fact, both are drawing on an older folk tune. A must-have for fans; the casual listener will probably want to start with 1965's Fairy Tale instead.
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