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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 24 August 2006
This book was chosen by my 8 year old daughter to write a review for her summer holiday homework. Being a fan I also read it and was intrigued by its complexity in travelling from the present to AD120 and BC 2375, not forgetting time to stop off for the doctor to learn about sculpture.

The break in the time line and its eventual solution needs a clear head, but together me and daughter think we've sussed it. Just watch out for the GENIE and be careful what you wish for!
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 23 January 2007
Since all of the other reviews on here refer to the actual book, I thought I'd write one for the audio CD. I can't say how it compares to the written book because I haven't got my hands on that yet, but it does say abridged, so some details must be left out.

Anyway, this is the first Doctor Who audio book I've listened to. I have heard how wonderful the Big Finish audio stories are and how much works goes into them, basically being acted out by different people like a radio drama or a read-along adventure, and I when I realised that The Stone Rose was a BBC audio book read by one person, I wondered what it'd be like. I had once listened to a Star Trek novel on tape years ago, and thought it was boring to listen to the entire thing read by one person. But I will say, David Tennant read The Stone Rose, and he did a terrific job. He does wonderful character voices and captures the inflections of Rose and Mickey and even Jackie just right, without actually trying to entirely impersonate them. I love his voice for the G.E.N.I.E. as well. He's great at doing The Doctor (of course!) and then slipping back to the narrative as David Tennant with his Scottish accent. I think after listening to this one it might be a let down by comparison to hear anyone else narrate these books as I've been spoiled! I am going to try and get my hands on Resurrection Casket next.

Aside from the audio aspect, it's just a really fun story too. Jacqueline Rayner really captured the essence of The Doctor and Rose's relationship, which I love so much about the series. The only other modern Who novel I've read is The Clockwise Man, which was good, but I'll rate The Stone Rose a bit better. It's truly a time travel story worthy of Who.

I'm glad these new novels have been good so far. Back in about 1990, I won a set of four Doctor Who novels from Doctor Who magazine. I was thrilled, especially since I live in Canada and the books are harder to come by. But then I ended up disappointed, because they just weren't very good books in my mind. They were the Timewyrm Genesis series ones, and seemed rather moody.

But I highly reccommend The Stone Rose! There's an interview with the author included as well, but for some reason it's not the best quality in audio.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Throughly enjoyed this book, although i read it in a matter of hours! I suppose this is a good thing as it means i kept wanting to read on, but on the other hand it kind of seemed over before it had began.

I like the relationship between Rose and The Doctor and this one is the most emotional of the first 3 tenth doctor books!

The plot itself is fantastic as it has little twists in and has an unexpected ending as things aren't what they seem!

I read this first of the 3 books and will be reading again to just go back and "figure" things out! Its very easy to read as rather than it being more scientific it is more historial so appeals at that level!

Its definately worth a read and would appeal to anyone even if they haven't watched any of the sereis on television or other books! Great!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 12 March 2015
Mickey Smith has something to show Rose and the Doctor in the British Museum. Amongst the classical antiquities is a life size statue of the goddess Fortuna that bears a more than striking resemblance to Rose.

It is an intriguing start that soon sees Rose and the Doctor propelled off to Rome in the second century. It makes it a good choice for this History Collection. Many of the books re-released for the series have been set in the twentieth century. This novel offers a period which is much further away in time and culture. Even so, we have seen the Doctor make several forays into the ancient Roman world. So this is not unfamiliar territory. The author has picked a period of Roman history that is relatively calm, during the middle of the age of ‘the five good emperors’. With no major political or military upheavals going on it is a fairly peaceful time which allows the Doctor and Rose to blend into Roman society and make their investigations. The Doctor even ditches his usual look for a traditional Roman tunic that lacks the pockets of his usual outfits.

A lot of the novel is taken up with the mystery of the statue. Rose and the Doctor ingratiate themselves into Roman society and have a lot of fun along the way. Much of this captures the early period of the Tenth Doctor. There is a lot to be enjoyed in the comparison between Rose’s and Vanessa’s misconceptions about Roman history and culture. It is a nice contrast that it is all amusing for Rose but utterly serious for Vanessa.
There is good characterisation of the Doctor and Rose. The novel successfully captures the dynamic of their relationship even though the book was written before their first series together. However, Mickey’s character and his relationship with the new Doctor is a little off.

There’s a fair amount of talk throughout about magic, prophecy and premonition not being real but when the explanation for what is happening is revealed it does seem very much like magic. The ‘scientific’ explanation for events is woefully inadequate. It is a struggle to believe that something could be genetically engineered to be able to perform magic. This also has an effect on the resolution of the plot. There might be some clever, well thought out, ‘timey wimey’ stuff but fundamentally is still relies on wishing things alright. Such a conclusion is a bit unsatisfying and too ‘fairy tale’ in essence.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Stone Rose is the seventh original BBC Doctor Who novel to tie-in with the revived series, this time featuring The Tenth Doctor and travelling companion Rose Tyler.
Jacqui Rayner has captured the essence of the newly regenerated Doctor; quirky, manic, fiercely intelligent and prone to the occasional burst of terrible anger. Rose, her neurotic mother Jackie, and on/off boyfriend Mickey Smith are also well written, and Mickey's heartfelt speech upon learning of Rose's `death' is appropriately moving.

The story itself is well-paced and engaging; beginning with Mickey leading Rose, Jackie and the Doctor through a museum, that reveals a 2000 year-old Roman sculpture of Rose. As is his wont, The Doctor immediately whisks Rose off in the TARDIS to Ancient Rome to get to the bottom of the mystery. They soon come across a man whose son has vanished, and encounter a slave who seems to have definite knowledge of the future. The mystery deepens when Rose herself disappears, and the result is a fun historical adventure with a bizarre and fantastical twist at the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 July 2008
This is the first Doctor Who audio book I've purchased, and the first Doctor Who "book" since my childhood and the time of Peter Davidson.
I was not disappointed by either the story line or the fantastic narrative of David Tennant. There are a few similarities to the recent series 4 story set in Pompei, but to be honest the Stone Rose is a far better idea, though the twist is awfully far fetched. The only problem is it is so compelling you will want to listen to both CDs at the one go - ideal for a long car journey then!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2006
This book, was, to quote the good man himself.. Fantastic.

I enjoyed every minute I read it and couldn't put it down-unfortunately that sometimes meant 'forgetting' my work!

Although relatively short, its packed with adventure, excitement and romance. Oh yeh, and humour, (a few references to the last Doctors rather large ears!!) The history aspect is interesting aswell-giving an insight into the lives of Romans and how much they 'valued' their art. I would recommend it if you consider yourself a true-who-fan or a david tennant obsessive. (I fall under both of those categories...)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I have read the book and listened the audio book narrated excellently by the 10th Doctor himself, David Tennant. While visiting the British Museum with Mickey and Jackie, Rose and the Doctor discover a statue that looks oddly familiar. So the Doctor and Rose find themselves in Ancient Rome. This is excellently written by Jacqueline Rayner, who is clearly a fan of the Doctor Who universe and researches her time periods very thoroughly.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A book that manages to accurately recreate the feel of the tv show, and also provide a story 'too broad for the small screen', which was the original remit of the previous series of novels.

The regular characters all show up and are all recreated superbly. The plot is very involved and full of the kind of technical discussion that you would expect from an episode of star trek. But it's very clever with it. Although it gets so involved at points that I wonder if young readers will be able to get their heads round it. And it may confuse a few older ones as well!

Still, all in all, a decent who novel and worth a look if you want more of them
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 22 January 2014
I chose this 5 star rating because I thought it deserved it for many reasons; the idea was good, it was extremely well written and I love the way Rayner has put the onscreen characters to paper so well. Also, the plot and characters are cool too. I would definitely reccommend this book to Whovians, to sci-fi fans and to anyone who wants a good Doctor Who book to read.
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