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Customer Review

18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Diminishing Returns, 24 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Sacrilege (Giordano Bruno 3) (Hardcover)
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This is the third outing for Giordano Bruno, the monk on the run turned astronomer turned Walsingham's employee, following Heresyand Prophecy. The story commences shortly after the second installment with the return of Bruno's love interest from Prophecy, Sophie, who is on the run from Canterbury, due to her husband having being murdered and her being the prime suspect. She seeks Bruno's help to prove her innocence.

So starts the story, which evolves with Walsingham wanting Bruno to also investigate other strange goings on in Canterbury.... two birds with one stone, so to speak.

As with the other two books in the series, the novel has likable characters, is well written and has great descriptions of Tudor England.

However (you knew it was coming from a three star review didn't you?), I started to lose interest approximately halfway through, with the story starting to run out of steam.... much of the descriptions and story started to seem repetitive.

Maybe I have now read too many of this genre, as they are all starting to feel "samey"...? I had similar issues with the recent Rory Clements offering, Traitor and the last Shardlake to be published to date, Heartstone (Matthew Shardlake 5).

Ok, but not brilliant (but will still read the next in the series, as want to know what happens to both Bruno and Sophie!).
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 25 Feb 2013 15:21:38 GMT
juandferg says:
Totally agree with M.Stevens, this genre has been done to death. What makes more galling is, despite the strong Tudor settings all the main characters see the world through 21st Century eyes; revisionist and unrealistic.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 May 2013 23:58:06 BDT
J. Kinory says:
Indeed, but what do you expect from a Guardian hack? This is not a novel but a Guardian treatise: biased, ignorant, patronising.
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