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Customer Review

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Overrated and mind-numbingly dull, 5 April 2013
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This review is from: The Nine Tailors (Lord Peter Wimsey) (Paperback)
I write this as a disappointed fan - I love Gaudy Night, Strong Poison, Have His Carcase and the short stories. I can even forgive the inherent snobbery in the books, with their 'grovellin' reverence for the aristocracy, what?' But I hated this book. It is possibly the dullest and least-well-told detective novel I've come across.

Nonetheless, duped by the countless glowing reviews of the book as sitting at the pinnacle of detective fiction, I ploughed on. Luckily, my insomniac stupor carried me through to the dreary, wittery end. And I was not impressed.

Fine to have a milieu of bell-ringing and to link aspects of the plot to that miserable, pedantic art, but to describe - for literally dozens of pages - the ringing of individual peals ... my God ... And as for the huge, tedious cast of muttering rustics ...

Yawn.

I shall, however, move on to Murder Must Advertise, but honestly, give me Christie any day!
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Initial post: 11 Apr 2015 03:09:40 BDT
Any book has charm, or repels, according to the reader but Christie is a very inferior author. In my opinion 'Clouds of Witness' and 'Murder must Advertise' are the best written but 'The Nine Tailors' remains my favourite. I'm not sure why but perhaps it is because anyone who has spent time with bells in a church tower can recognise their power, for good or ill, and Sayers captured this metaphysical trait perfectly. Or maybe it was the first time I encountered Sayers in the form of Ian Carmichael's portrayal of Wimsey in the 1970's. I hope you enjoyed 'Murder must advertise' more than this one, but for me this is the perfect Sayers tale.
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