Customer Review

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Three hours of "gay" nostalgia, 27 Sept. 2008
This review is from: Country, Bluegrass & Mountain Music (Audio CD)
Turn nostalgic and get into that selection of 60 old-time country classics. Of course that's not a concert in a honky-tonk. Of course it is not a concert in the music entertaining park in Nashville. It's not even the old 78 rpm's or even 36 or 45 rpm's that used to scratch.

That's not the live broadcasting on the radios before FM sound. It has been re-mastered and cleaned up. But the tunes are there, the old voices are there, the words and the music are there. Be nostalgic and relive three hours of the deep bluegrass prairie, the deep resonant range up in Texas or Arizona, or up in the eastern mountains. The music is clear like the song of a lark in the morning in some garden of Eden.

And it sings love and love and love, love as a pleasure and even divorce and departure as a pleasant liberation. The best character is the gay ranchero who is more a gigolo or a playboy or a pleasure lady's man with no attachment nowhere but a quick love affair anywhere he sets his feet and saddle. But don't be mistaken by fables told about cowboys. He is gay like a laughing clown not like those who get married in New York, San Francisco or Los Angeles.

The main theme of this music is the territory, but both concrete in generic details and abstract because it can be nearly everywhere. It is this open territory of cowboys, this nature that is endless because crossed by no highway nor spoiled by no urban development not to speak of the sprawl. And the honky-tonks are along the desert roads or tracks, some kind of rendezvous points in the middle of nowhere like some Zabriskie Point in the great plains or the high plateaus.

Nostalgic but the metallic sound of the banjo and the definitely major tones make that nostalgia something that has to be desired, that is deeply human and humanizing. You can only be a balanced and full human being if you reach that knowledge of that nowhere territory where freedom means the sky and liberty means the wind and the sun.

Even a lament becomes a celebration of the fate of all cowboys as a happy adventure in which separation and severance are structural pieces of the puzzle of life. So just add the smell of beer, unluckily the smoke of tobacco or whatever that is still there in so many of these faraway drinking places, and the poor mikes, and the loud sound and you may reconstruct that atmosphere of a honky-tonk somewhere in Paris, Texas or Nice, California.

Then you may decide to look for your old records and listen to them again, or to look for un-remastered recordings of old pieces. Have a good experience.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, University Paris Dauphine, University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne & University Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines
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Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 13 Jan 2009 16:18:08 GMT
Bargee says:
Very French!!!!! Lots of words, but not a lot of meaning. More like a stylistic exercise. Does not say anything about this particular CD and does not help me decide if I might buy it or not. If I had not loved this type of music since I first encountered it in the 1960s this review would have intellectualized it to such a degree I would not bother to find out about it.

Posted on 23 Dec 2009 16:44:24 GMT
Last edited by the author on 23 Dec 2009 16:45:06 GMT
gille liath says:
Tricky writing a review in a foreign language. I admire your endeavour, Dr Coulardeau; but, in modern English, the word 'gay' is generally given a very different meaning from the one you intend.

That's except for 'Brokeback Mountain', of course.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jan 2010 03:03:18 GMT
Bea says:
Hey! Don't attack the French! Not our fault if this pompous git is on the loose on Amazon UK. And that is not intellectualisation: that is meaningless logorrhea.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Feb 2010 20:22:51 GMT
Logorrhea! I'm loving it. I'd never heard that before but I will be appropriating it and dishing out lots!

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 19:43:46 BDT
R. A. Caton says:
I am reminded of the American girl in the Punch cartoon who responded "You sure slobbered a bibful, Sir"

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 22:32:24 BDT
Last edited by the author on 16 Aug 2012 22:39:39 BDT
Gille liath apparently does not know how to read, probably because there is only one paragraph. But here is what I wrote:

"He is gay like a laughing clown not like those who get married in New York, San Francisco or Los Angeles." In 2008 that was slightly adventurous, but not so much for SF and LA up to the November Proposition 8 vote.

And I should have added "like the clown of Stephen King's IT"

Sorry for the delay.

Jacques

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 22:37:33 BDT
Who told you I was French? Actually I learned French at school. Sorry Bargee to disappoint you. Good trial though, or should I say attempt?

Jacques

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 22:39:27 BDT
Last edited by the author on 16 Aug 2012 22:42:14 BDT
Meaninglessness is the impossibility for a reader to see meaning in what that reader reads. That does not mean what that reader reads does not have any meaning.

Pompous Chomsky declared that the sentence "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" was meaningless in 1957. He was still young at the time. he must have discovered poetry in the mean time.

By the way should I say reading person to be politically correct, or readress for a female reader, Dear Bea?

Jacques

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 22:46:07 BDT
At last a boy who is not afraid of getting stars in his eyes.

Logorrhea has to do with the tongue, the lips, the larynx and the glottis. To like it sounds like liking kissing, and French kissing at that, why not deepthroating kissing? Well boy gille laith is going to say that sounds gay like in Brokeback Mountain. At least it is not bareback.

Go on admiring stars, they deserve it.

Jacques

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 22:48:42 BDT
Well, R.A. Caton, we are back on Brokeback Mountain and this time again not bareback but using a French letter that is well filled after use. Is that the bib you mean?

Jacques
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