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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Least qualified reader perhaps however..., 11 Feb 2009
This review is from: Biochemistry: International Edition (Hardcover)
I don't have A levels, so my review maybe not as qualified :). I'm self teaching neuroscience-this was my biochem choice.

Apart from some math which like so many books expects you have a tutor clarifying the symbols of equations, this book is very clear to me.

I have worked through to beta sheets in 2 sessions, its fairly compelling-if you have a need for the subject!

Clear detailed pictures make things more engaging and so far keep me reading on !

I'd suggest an book like Chemistry for the Biosciences: The Essential Conceptsif you are like me and need more fundementals like orbitals and dipoler molecules etc Also an excellent clear book.

If you have A level chemistry, this is probably dead straightforward!

Now I need some math tutoring :)
******

Doh! Get Maths for Chemistry by Monk if things like Delta, Sigma or (capital) Pi puzzle you. They're actually dead easy it was just ignorance on my part.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 4 Mar 2009 21:11:50 GMT
I've actually invested in Alberts The Molecular Biology of the Cell as it complements this volume in some ways-at least in what I've seen of it so far. Stryer starts off at a level that really does require a bit of maths/chemistry at A level. Only by skimming lightly over the bits with math stuff in was I able to continue onto the interesting discussions of how exactly molecular forces result in protein folding. Conceptually it's quite easy. There are several kinds of bond and intraatomic/intermolecular forces both repulsive and attractive, the interaction of these result roughly in the lowest energy shape of a protein structure. Thats roughly the essence of one particular chapter. However in that I've missed out some complex stuff Stryer covers early. This review will be updated as my overall reading advances and my knowledge improves as this is what I'm actively teaching myself (in part) for the next few months! Check back again if this text is a consideration for a future course, I may be better informed.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Oct 2009 19:15:47 BDT
I'm also teaching myself Neuroscience in the same way as you, your list has been a great help in choosing books!!!

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Dec 2009 19:02:49 GMT
Your welcome! :)

I'm holding out now for Eric Kandles new book due out in 2010 :).

In reply to an earlier post on 24 May 2010 14:43:28 BDT
The latest Netter's Neuroscience book I review is excellent btw. Also there is a new version of the Neuroanatomy by Clinical Cases, though I have a feeling it's 90% the same material.

You would complement the Stryer book with The Cell though I probably should have noted that the Chemistry for the Biosciences books (Paul Monk again) is the place to start before those two. At least the first few chapters so that you get your forces and basic notation stuff clear. By now of course, this is moot.

I may build a small website detailing my own approach to teaching myself this stuff-as if I can't quite take the time/money to pay for Uni tuition, I bet plenty of others are in the same boat too.
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