Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sad story of UK government mismanagement - amongst many other sad stories, 22 Mar. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: It's Our Turn to Eat (Paperback)
In the early `90's I used to travel frequently on business to Africa - but primarily West Africa and usually Nigeria. I enjoyed it (mostly) and learned a great deal and met some wonderful people - but I did find it extraordinarily stressful. It was always a relief and relaxation to make a trip to Kenya. Warm, friendly, educated people living in a truly beautiful country. I only had the most superficial view/experience of it but it did seem to me to be a largely successful country which sat outside the stereotype of African countries.

I thoroughly enjoyed both of Michaela Wrong's early books - particularly the second about Eritrea and so was looking forward to this. It is a painful, shocking and illuminating read. Other reviewers here have commented well on the contents. What struck me by the end was the complicity of the British in a thoroughly corrupt political process - with a few notable exceptions such as Sir Edward Clay - and, indeed, worsening it through the totally mistaken implementation of DfID policies under Hilary Benn. When I read those splendid statements about our government's commitment to relieving poverty and strengthening democracy in Africa - I had no idea of the reality on the ground.

I thoroughly recommend this book - it should be read by every government minister - past, present and future - and by anyone interested in Africa.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 2 May 2009 22:29:44 BDT
Last edited by the author on 2 May 2009 22:45:10 BDT
This book is fascinating but unlike Ethan Edwards, I wasn't surprised at the collusion of the British government, particularly the Labour government who is always looking for ways to " to assuage its "guilt" for past British colonial involvement in Kenya - by channelling more and more funds into the country which then disappear into the pockets of government officials. This is nothing new and those who believed Kenya is any different to any other developing country are naive. I have been to beautiful Kenya, but do not profess to know about it at all, apart from what I read, but it interests me all the same. What struck a chord with me as I read this enthralling book, were the similarities between a country where I lived in South America for eighteen years (being married to a national of that country) - and this story. Although Latin America doesn't have the problems of "tribe", corruption at high level is virtually the same as that which has transpired in Kenya. Like many countries in Africa, corruption in L.A. is endemic from the President down to the man who puts petrol in your car, to the official who renews your identity card or the man who gives you the correct answers when you go to take your driving test! Everything in "It's Our Turn to Eat" was entirely familiar. The cycle of corruption is almost impossible to break because it is a way of life. If you rock the boat, life can be made intolerable. However, it is interesting to note the (nearly always) negative comments about the legacy of British colonialism, because I can remember a Latin friend saying "you know, it seems to me that the wrong ships reached Latin America" - meaning that if it had been the British who had arrived on those shores as opposed to the Spanish Conquistadores, life might be quite different today!
‹ Previous 1 Next ›