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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "An Appalling Innocence", 20 Nov 2007
This review is from: Into the Wild (Paperback)
Christopher McCandless was twenty four when he headed off alone with the intention of surviving by what he could hunt and garner in the wilds of Alaska. People have since labelled him as reckless, arrogant and stupid - but with his idealistic yearning to emulate Tolstoy, Jack London and Thoreau, was he not in fact courageous and noble? He was certainly ill-prepared for such a venture and paid the ultimate price for his odyssey.

Jon Krakauer, the author of the book, had a particular, vested interest in the tragic tale. He too as a young man had experienced a similar compulsion to set himself against the wild elements, to rebel against his conventional lifestyle and upbringing. In his opening note, Krakauer seems to apologise for including his own story of setting out to conquer a mountain and almost losing his life in the process; but I found this account even more intense and compelling than the sometimes over-meticulous details of everyone encountered by McCandless in his last months.

The unavoidable conjecture as to McCandless's motivation, his troubled family background, and state of mind in his last awful weeks, make a compelling reason for using this book as a set text in schools. Most cultures have a kind of "coming of age" ritual, especially for young men, who have to test themselves, set themselves against the establishment. There is much in the book that should open discussion with teenagers - though surely there must be a way to opt out of the conventional path most unquestioning people's lives take, without sacrificing their own life, as most of the rather depressing examples quoted in the book do.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 17 Jun 2009 12:23:48 BDT
rubsley says:
"Surely there must be a way to opt out of the conventional path most unquestioning people's lives take, without sacrificing their own life, as most of the rather depressing examples quoted in the book do."

I'd like to think there is: I had a similar sort of 'adventure' to McCandless, Kerouac, et al - only I didn't die or go alcoholic at the end of it and it sort of has a happy ending. If you'd like to check it out search "Discovering Beautiful". It's a little known book as yet but will hopefully do well once word gets around.

Cheers!
Rory

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jun 2009 16:14:35 BDT
Four Violets says:
Good for you! I will order your book and review it if you like but I have to warn you it will be an honest review..if that's ok, I'd love to read it -..see its published by YouWriteOn, I have also posted on that in the past. Good for you too getting published. I had adventures too...mostly in the past, more staid now, but about to tick off my 60th country. Check out my review of The Light Garden of the Angel King, I sort of agree with your review of In Patagonia, but Peter Levi travelled with Bruce Chatwin and writes about it in The Light Garden, and he sounds a really "different" person, I would love to have met them both. I've been to Patagonia btw - rode right to the Miledon cave -
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