Customer Review

26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Inaccurate, waste of time battery tester, 12 Aug. 2011
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This review is from: Silverline 633909 Battery, Bulb and Fuse Tester 1.5 V - 9 V (Tools & Hardware)
I bought one of these and used it to test several batteries recently. Whilst it seemed to indicate there was a charge on many of my old (mostly AA) batteries, I am now extremely sceptical of this. Just now, one of our clocks stopped working due to an exhausted battery so I took this opportunity to double check what the tester thought of the dead battery. Rather worryingly, despite the battery clearly being dead and a new battery restarting the clock fine, the tester showed the old exhausted battery as being well within the green "Good" range. Clearly not worth it....
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Tracked by 3 customers

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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 1 Oct 2012 05:25:37 BDT
Clatters says:
Digital Multimeter Tester With Test Leads- Multi-Meter MultiTester

I think that's what you need. Eliminates all scepticism.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2014 09:33:31 GMT
Last edited by the author on 22 Feb 2014 19:04:40 GMT
Yes, but only if you use the tip described below.

If you have a box of resistors that have different values and if you know how to calculate the amount of resistance to use to match the load current which the battery is having to supply, here's a tip:

You will get a reliable indication of the condition of the battery if you first connect the correct value of load resistor across the battery before you either stick the test leads from a voltmeter onto it or put it into the jaws of a battery tester. In practice it is quite a fiddly procedure to carry out - until you get used to doing it! - but testing a battery in this way will always work, even for the simple type of battery tester which is the subject of this comment.

The most practical solution to the problem of finding out if a battery you are using inside some equipment is dying or dead is this: change the battery (or batteries) for fresh ones... You will soon see if your equipment works properly again.

Another point which needs to be understood about the kind of battery tester that has jaws that close onto the terminals of the battery is that the design has to be a compromise to be sure that, when using it, you won't end-up draining the battery that is being tested so much that, after testing, it is dead. A load resistor that has a low enough resistance value to test a big fat D cell would drain all the charge out of a fresh button cell very quickly!

So the design ends-up having to be suitable for testing a tiny button cell without killing it, so the the tester on its own ends-up being almost useless for testing the much bigger AAA, AA, C and D cells...

A further point which may be of interest: these types of simple tester actually have two different load resistors inside them: one to test a 1.5 volt button cell and the other to test a 9 volt PP3 battery.

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Feb 2014 11:50:01 GMT
Last edited by the author on 22 Feb 2014 11:55:21 GMT
Ivan says:
Good post.
However.... I would have thought that the point of a battery tester would be to test how viable a battery might be - which means it HAS to be tested under an appropriate load - and I naively would imagine that a sold-for-purpose battery tester would do just that and not just measure the emf across its own internal resistance. Many completely useless cells can give quite high voltage readings into an infinite load and surely a competently designed tester would take that into consideration? Might as well sell a wooden box with symbols and YES! painted on the side, otherwise.
I've just ordered the Draper combined tester unit
Draper-57574-Battery-Continuity-Tester
assuming that the family would be able to use it without having to get slide rules out and measure Interocitor constants. Have I been too optimistic?
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