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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Eurabia, 28 Aug. 2007
This review is from: God's Continent: Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis (Hardcover)
Jenkins is a dissenter from the opinion of many author's that Europe faces such a demographic onslaught from Muslim immigrants that the continent will become Eurabia where Islam dominates and all non-Muslims are mere dhimmis. He thinks the demography will change and immigrant families become smaller. He also thinks that Islam will change and adapt in Europe. He is also an optimist about the future of Christianity. He thinks Christianity is far from a dying influence. It will adapt though numbers will reduce. This is the judgment of a liberal academic. I would not be so rash as to prophesy but I do not share his optimism over the future as regards Islam .
But as to the present facts of religion in Europe, Jenkins paints with a broad brush but I think he is fairly accurate, with the glaring exception of the assessment he gives to John Calvin. He certainly gives a balanced picture of Islamic diversity in Europe and also good reasons why European governments have been extraordinarily tolerant of the kinds of activities and organisations which Islamic governments persecute and ban. This is a book informative on now. As to the future, we shall have to wait and see.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 2 Jan 2008 19:27:32 GMT
Don't like Jenkins' assessment of Calvin, eh? Jenkins says he "established a repressive, theocratic regime in Geneva, with moral and religious orthodoxies enforced by the full force of state power" (p.260). That may not be the kindest way of putting the matter. But if it needs qualification at all, then it is because the "state power" didn't always agree to "enforce" as thoroughly as Calvin himself would have liked. The party opposed to him were christened by his supporters "the Libertines"! For a one-sentence, by-the-way generalisation, then, Jenkins is hardly way off the mark.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Nov 2009 10:48:09 GMT
G. J. Weeks says:
Calvin was not even a citizen of Geneva until the last 5 years of his life. He did not establish a theocratic regime. He inherited it and opposed the right of the state to interfere in the church. The state tried Servetus. JC was but a witness and opposed the burning as the method of execution.
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