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Customer Review

30 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A slightly frustrating waste of an evening, 25 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Master Of War: The Blooding: Part one of an epic adventure set during the Hundred Years' War (Kindle Edition)
As a fan of medieval fiction I was more than willing to spend a few pennies on what I hoped would be a fresh take on the plague ridden Hundred years war. Unfortunately the book turned out to be a rather rough and rushed, but cheap, genre filler, with fairly weak characterisation and numerous historical inaccuracies appearing from the outset. When I say the outset I mean the outset, as it opens with a pair of FREEMEN being arrested and arbitrarily sentenced to hang. If the author (or his editor) had a basic grasp of English constitutional history and/or law he'd be aware of a little process called a jury trial, and hopefully a little document called the Magna Carta, that guaranteed this right a hundred and twenty odd years before the date of the novel (reissued and tweaked several times several times since 1215). Then there are the annoying nonsensical phrases such as a: "short-bladed bastard sword that cost sixpence" (bastard signifying a sword with a 4+ foot blade), along with the numerous references to firing arrows / bolts.... I could go on. Anyway ignoring the lack of research and editing, the plot is reasonably entertaining and worthy of an evening of your time.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 18 Jan 2014 19:57:52 GMT
I think you will find that Magna Carta had almost nothing to do with the "rights" of the main characters. It was essentially a document resulting from the power struggle between the king, the lords and the church. It was an attempt to regain rights ( Lords and church) which had been lost to the king since the reign of Henry I. Any reference to the rights of man meant Lords. Anyone lower was not even considered. As to women the Married Women's property act 1884 should give a clue as to the rights of women in 1215. Many of the lower sort were arrested and hanged without trial by powerful local officials for many hundreds of years after Magna Carta.
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