Customer Review

53 of 59 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Ultimate Victory, 18 Feb. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Upstairs Downstairs - Series 1 [DVD] (DVD)
Having not only been a fan of the original "Upstairs Downstairs" TV series, but having produced for Australian radio a series of specials that gave me the privilege to meet many of the original cast and interview them, I came to this sequel with great trepidation and a fair degree of hostility. Trying to invade 165 Eaton Place even with Jean Marsh in residence, seemed a little like walking on sacred ground to me.

Certainly there are things in this lavish BBC dramatisation that seem out of place with the wonderful original. The old series had a modest budget and at times that helped give the series its unique feel. Everything was modest down to the slightly shakey scenery outside the windows, but these stories were playlets for TV, three short wonderful acts , no music, no major cutting around, often scenes of seven or eight minutes just between two actors. Wonderful.

The new beast is overloaded with budget, music and general BBC sumptuousness. For this reason it took a long while to win me over, the music trumpets every emotion and invades the world a little like a 1930s movie music soundtrack. Yet above and beyond there is a wonderful heart to this new series and a great selection of actors lead by the aforementioned Ms Marsh (my how Rose has aged in 6 years, and can someone please tell me how Rose ended up running an employment agency, when the original series ended she was on her way to he country to look after the next generation of Bellamys--what went wrong???!!!!)

Backing Jean all the way is the original co creator of the series (with Jean)_ the wonderful Eileen Atkins who makes a meal of the grand mother in law of the house. Warm and zany yet a little intimidating, this is one of Atkins' greatest performances. Without her and Ms Marsh, the new series would probably flounder ,despite a truly excellent male lead in Ed Stoppard as the master of the house and one a good deal more forceful and commanding than the original Lord Bellamy I might add.

So yes, this series does play with a legend and yes it probably would have been better under another name. But the thirties gives such rich material to any drama of servants and their masters and their kings (just look at "the King's Speech") So let us welcome back, albeit with a few reservations, 165 Eaton Place and its mostly new inhabitants. I am pleased the Beeb has commissioned a further six episodes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 12 Dec 2011 22:48:57 GMT
Byron Kolln says:
Fantastic review. My theory on what happened to Rose after she moved with Lord Bellamy and his young family is this:

Lord Bellamy passes away, leaving Rose a small but valuable piece of investment (probably a way of repaying some of what James had lost when he invested Rose's money in the stock exchange). Richard's wife Virginia decides that she'll let Rose go, seeing as her two children are now grown, and having little use for a nanny. Rose returns to London to open an employment agency, Buck's of Belgravia, which provides her income until Lady Agnes invites her back as housekeeper of 165.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.2 out of 5 stars (199 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (123)
4 star:
 (32)
3 star:
 (19)
2 star:
 (15)
1 star:
 (10)
 
 
 
£19.99 £2.29
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: NSW, Australia

Top Reviewer Ranking: 513,802