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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars short, well written but the logic is flawed, 28 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: God and Stephen Hawking: Whose Design is it Anyway? (Paperback)
The book is well written and easy to follow. But when you read about the so-called flaws in Hawking's logic, you have to ask yourself either "how can Hawking have been so stupid as to not have spotted these obvious flaws", or else "how can Lennox have misunderstood Hawking so badly?"

Having read Grand Design and a number of other similar works by scientists such as Hawking, Brian Greene and Michio Kaku, my conclusion is that Lennox is using the time-honoured technique of "reductio ad absurdum", i.e. he intentionally mis-represents what is in Grand Design, in order to easily demolish it. The points which Grand Design makes are either mis-described, taken out of context or else different semantic meanings are ascribed to the actual words that Hawking used.

Lennox constantly refers to the eminent scientists Kepler, Newton and Maxwell, all of whom believed in God. Of course they did but they did not have access to the knowledge that we have. They did not know that the Universe is expanding (i.e. they did not know about the Big Bang), nor were Relativity, atomic theory or Quantum theory around in their day. They did not know about Darwinian Evolution (ok - Darwin published his seminal work about 2 years before Maxwell published his).

In summary - worth a read but keep your wits about you. It smacks of desperation, IMO
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In reply to an earlier post on 2 Oct 2013 07:39:45 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 2 Oct 2013 10:41:57 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2014 18:31:50 GMT
I'd suggest you're both correct, as Lennox uses "reductio ad absurdum' to create the straw man.

"Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand."

Albert Einstein.
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