Customer Review

65 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different approach to an old subject, 18 July 2009
This review is from: The Help (Paperback)
This is a brave book that views the American Civil Rights movement largely through the eyes of the people at its sharp end - the black maids who looked after white folks children. This gives the book an authentic period feel and draws the reader in so that they feel transported to the early 1960s - the period the book is set in. The author, however, Miss Stockett, also draws some impressive white characters - especially the poor, ill-educated Miss Celia - a character who could give the average Big Brother contestant a run for their money in the intellectual stakes!
The book is funny in places and certainly makes the reader feel empathy towards the poor, the put upon and the neglected. The only drawback is the language used - as the authentic '60s American style is not so easily read by a 2009 Englishman! Still, I praised the book for its authenticity so you can't have it both ways.
If you like this I also recommend other books about race and the struggle for freedom:One Love Two Colours: The Unlikely Marriage of a Punk Rocker and His African Queen by Margaret Oshindele (my wife) - a book about a successful inter-racial marriage and Destined to Witness: Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany - the true story of a mixed race boy growing up in Nazi Germany. Both are extremely interesting reads that leave the reader thinking about their own prejudices and stereotypes.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 26 Aug 2009 13:14:35 BDT
The Language used is not American. It is the language used still today in the American South. Being born and raised in the deep South, I wondered if my Irish and English friends would have trouble with the Negro dialect, and even with the white manner of putting things. I guess you answered my question. You might also have trouble relating to all the minute details describing what everyone eats and wears, etc. It took me back to where I was fifty odd years ago. I'm so glad to be here in England.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Apr 2011 23:55:42 BDT
Miss Hargin says:
I liked that it was written in that dialect, it pulled me right in and made it feel like Aibileen was there telling me the story herself

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Nov 2011 23:01:29 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Nov 2011 23:05:36 GMT
Negro dialect ? You haven't been taken back 50 years at all...u never left Sandra Darnielle. Move on... its highly offensive to use the word negro in the context that you have used it. Keep reading, educate to elevate and all that... (rolling of eyes)

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Dec 2011 21:41:49 GMT
S. B. Kelly says:
I had no trouble (Southern English, born and bred) in following the dialect. You have only to read a sentence aloud to understand it.
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