Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Listen with Prime Learn more Shop now
Customer Review

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite satisfying, 25 Mar. 2014
This review is from: The Shadow Of The Crescent Moon (Paperback)
In the fictionalized version of the city of Mir Ali in Pakistan, which lies close to the border with Afghanistan, three brothers are having breakfast on what is one of the most important festival days in the Muslim calendar, Eid.
One of the brothers Aman Erum, recently returned from studying in America. Sikandar has recently lost his son in an attack on the hospital where he works. His wife Mina who was a lecturer in the department of psychology at the same hospital, has disengaged herself from her previous life and now attends the funerals of strangers in an attempt to `find' her son.
The youngest brother, Hayat, is fighting a long running war to have Mir Ali separated from Pakistani and become part of Afghanistan.
After the brothers have finished breakfast they will part ways and make decisions that may affect each other lives forever.
The novel is set during one morning during the hours of 9am and noon. However, the novel moves from that morning to the past as we find out what lead the three brothers and their families to this point of time and the decisions they feel they have to make.
Though the triumvirate of brothers are initially to be read as the main characters of the novel it becomes apparent as the novel enters its middle section that in fact the two main protagonists are two women; Mina the wife of Sikandar and Samarra who fights alongside Hayat and has a relationship with him and his brother Aman Erum. Mina's pain and anguish at the death of her son, Zalan is so well crafted, so palpable that the reader feels compelled to look away from the page sensing the character Mina, will turn on us the reader for intruding in her suffering.
Samarra is the epitome of the new Pakistan woman. Samarra is no longer willing to be a slave to men or a background player in her country's future. Her childhood has been played out against 9/11, Pakistan's war against insurgency, Pakistan's willingness to open its airspace to the USA and towns like Mir Ali being bombed by drones. All these and other events in her life have inextricably bound her to this fateful morning. The author has created Samarra using words as the veins and arteries and the pages as bone and her story as Samarra's skin. Samarra has been lovingly drawn and born of the author's emotions.
However, the same cannot be said of two of the three brothers; Hayat and Sikandar. While Aman Eram is a fully rounded character I felt by the end of the book that Hayat and Sakinder were as unknown to me as they were on page one. The two brother's identities become smothered by their strong well written female counterparts. Hayat's need to become a fighter with the Mir Ali underground is never fully explained and what is related is far from satisfactory.
At times the book read like a polemical diatribe with the author, niece of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, riding her high horse for all its worth. Samarra and Hayat are looked upon as heroic with the author leaving us in no doubt in that what they are doing is right. But the question should have been asked if Samarra and Hayat are terrorists or freedom fighters. We all know the cliché `one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter', ( Nelson Mandela, Che Guevara, Michael Collins to name but a few), but this concept is never explored and had it been then it would have helped make this novel a more satisfactory read.

Number of Pages - 231

Sex Scenes - None

Profanity - None

Genre - Fiction.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

Be the first person to comment on this review.

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]