Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Neither Superficial Nor Subjective, 27 Sept. 2007
This review is from: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion (Paperback)
Intended as an introductory text for undergraduates and the general reader, Davies' book provides a broad and balanced account of philosophy of religion as practiced in the analytic tradition in America and the United Kingdom. The topics covered are those that are likely to be encountered by an undergraduate undertaking a first course: analysis of the monotheistic concept of divinity, arguments for the existence of God, miracles, the nature of religious language etc. The exclusion of Eastern religions and philosophy thus reflects the anglo-american academic tradition (if the is a charge of eurocentrism to me made, it seems unfair to level it at Davies: he is well aware of the material he chooses not to cover). Arguments are placed in the context of various traditions in Western philosophy, and are developed in sufficient depth to allow beginners to appreciate the complexity of the issues raised. The result is neither superfical nor subjective: OUP is to be congratulated in taking this excellent text book to a third edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 22 Jan 2012 22:17:40 GMT
trini says:
As a comment on E Haynes's review (as of another favourable review too), see my review of Davies's book here.
I quote extracts from it, slightly modified, summarizing my reason for giving Davies only a 2-star rating:
"I am making rather a campaign of what I have to say here, and it is this: it is empty talk to discuss religion without concentrating on the historical records of the New Testament and the historical person of Jesus Christ, as observable `secular' realities, not only as objects or constructs of faith. I simply will not accept, that we do not know what religion is, or what we may mean by God, that we can either have no ideas about these matters, or else that we have to talk about the priest-king of Frazer's Golden Bough, or the Polynesian `cargo cults' of the 19th and 20th centuries, or African animist religions, or the Buddha, or whatever or whoever. ... What I am insisting on is that the New Testament and Jesus Christ must be put into the centre of every discussion of religion. To discuss God, say, or the nature of the soul, by quoting some smart maxim from Descartes or Wittgenstein, and to leave out what Jesus and Paul and the whole New Testament have to say about God, and the soul, and morality, and eternal life, is to me simply farcical."
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer

E. Haynes
(REAL NAME)   

Location: United Kingdom

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,124,633