Customer Review

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb Analysis Of The Impulse To Pain In Erotic Fantasies, 17 Jan. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Sadeian Woman: An Exercise in Cultural History (Paperback)
The Marquis de Sade may well be more famous for misattributions of the terms `sadism' and `sadomasochism' than for what he actually wrote and thought. For many people who routinely involve an element of pain and/or humiliation in their erotic practices and fantasies, the bloody antics in Sade's works are simply nauseating. Angela Carter here provides a much needed context for these works, showing that Sade's view of the world was surprisingly egalitarian for his times, highlighting the gross inequities of class as well as gender. This is a scholarly book, containing much food for thought and contemplation. It provides a secure foundation stone for true feminism, in the sense of seeking true equality of humanity, and not simply a trivial glossy equality with overtones of revenge. Angela Carter was one of the most impressive writers of novels in the last century, and this deeply thinking work impressed me by its insight into what constitutes true equality. This book should interest anyone seeking enlightenment into the psychology that underlies so-called sadomasochistic activities, and indeed also the need for pain, inflicting or inflicted, in many common fantasies.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Feb 2010 16:59:20 GMT
Lucretira12 says:
There are factual errors in this review. 'Sadism' is a term invented by German sexologist Krafft-Ebing more than a century after Sade's death, taking, in fact, Sade's name as its root. The acronymic term, 'masochism' was crafted by the German in the same work. Sade cannot have misappropriated a term coined long after his death.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2010 08:54:40 BDT
-This is true. Leopold von Sacher Masoch was Krafft-Ebing's reference for the term masochism also, from Sacher Masoch's novella "Venus in Furs". For more information on this read "Psychopathia Sexualis".

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2010 11:00:16 BDT
Clifford says:
I cannot see what factual errors in my review are referred to here. I simply averred that 'sadism' and 'sadomasochism' are all too frequently used erroneously - today, post Krafft-Ebing! What the good Marquis is famous for - today - is barely relevant to what contribution he felt he was making before Krafft-Ebing gave his interpretation. 'Masochism' (which is, incidentally, no more an 'acronym' than is 'sadism') was similarly not something that Leopold von Sacher-Masoch would have recognised.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2010 11:02:58 BDT
Clifford says:
My response to Lucretira12's comment applied equally well here. I have no problem with the factual content of either comment, just puzzlement at how my review may have been perceived as erroneous.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.0 out of 5 stars (4 customer reviews)
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
Used & New from: £2.83
Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,283