Customer Review

3 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Longer than the Dark Ages themselves, and not as interesting, 29 Oct. 2008
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This review is from: Credo (Paperback)
Credo is a big book, about 900 pages, but after about 9 pages it rapidly becomes clear that this big fat book is going to be a long and rather dull experience. It becomes so fustrating that you actively want BAD THINGS to happen to the characters, and cheer on the malevolent fate that keeps them apart.

The book is about the rise of Christianity in Dark Age Britain. It has a cast of saints and heroes. Its writer is neither, he is the true villan of the piece. Its a potentially interesting story but Braggs lumpen prose turns it into an unbearably stodgy mess. It might have merited two stars if it had been half the length.

I paid just £1 for this book and I feel the price tag was unjustified. It should be pulped, and possibly its writer as well.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 2 Jan 2013 15:04:36 GMT
R. Conway says:
It's not as bad as this reviewer makes out, and his/her own spelling mistakes or typos show a bit of hastiness. But, having got to page 190 so far, I concur to some extent. Melvyn Bragg's prose is often expressive, but words and expressions are often poorly & hastily chosen; it is not the length itself that is in the least objectionable, but the quality of writing which fails to sustain it. It goes bad with the introduction of the future Northumbrian king Ecgfrith, coarsely demonised in Mills & Boon style to be a foil to the sensitive Padric, and his maternity inaccurately attributed to a British princess Rhiainmelt of Rheged when his mother was probably Eanfled, an Anglo Saxon daughter of Edwin of Deira. Bragg's stupid style here is an affront to intelligent readers.
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