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Customer Review

19 of 37 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Yes, but, 17 April 2012
This review is from: Jilted Generation: How Britain has Bankrupted its Youth (Kindle Edition)
Well, I am of the older generation presumed to have had it easy but it did not seem like that to me at the time. I held down two jobs while studying undergraduate studies, and during postgraduate studies worked a full time night shift job to finance it all. When I bought my first flat I was earning £800 and my mortgage was £526 a month (interest rate jumped harshly at the beginning of 1990s and was highest ever for few years). I barely had enough to eat and, yes, now things are much better but I do not feel that I 'got it easy' as authors of this book suggest. Perhaps they are of a generation used to get it easy from the start and look on in envy what our generation has now without insight in how we got here.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 20 Jan 2014 23:33:58 GMT
Last edited by the author on 21 Jan 2014 00:11:06 GMT
guitar*man says:
I agree with you - the bloke who is wingeing for the youth of today has no clue what he is on about.

There was much lower home ownership in the 60's and earlier - it was difficult to get mortgages - most working people rented.

There was high youth unemployment in the 70's and 80's - so what - get a job and get over it. Many students back then worked part time in pubs or restaurants or on building sites I recall. Why can't the current lot do that? Not interesting enough?

The youth have not contributed anything yet by definition.

It all boils down to house prices - if they were not rising (result of credit deregulation in the 80's) no-one would be that bothered. Only those who have saved have a decent pension and a home - and many were fleeced by pension mis-selling in the 80's and 90's.
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